HomeQ&A"Solid colors"

"Solid colors"

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Estoy buscando una buena traducción de "buy clothes in solid colors," del inglés al español castizo.

Se me hace que decir "colores sólidos" es un anglicismo. "De un solo color" tampoco es adecuado.

Necesito ideas, por favor

11542 views
updated OCT 24, 2008
posted by Benaugusto

24 Answers

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Marisa Estrada said:

Solid colors = color liso There are not other way to translate. Fabrics are: telas de colores lisos (solid colors fabrics) o telas estampadas (printed fabrics).

If you want to buy a shirt in solid colors, just you have to ask for "una camiseta de color XXXX ".


What about stripes (e.g. in men's clothing for shirts, suits, ties, etc.)? These are clearly not printed but woven of different colored threads.

updated OCT 24, 2008
posted by samdie
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Hey look, I'll give you props, but what I meant was that having the contrast (telas estampidas) and the context provided was helpful.

grin

James Santiago said:

Natasha said:

Thanks, Marisa, that's the most helpful suggestion so far.

Hey, I was the first one to suggest that yesterday!

>

updated OCT 24, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Natasha said:

Thanks, Marisa, that's the most helpful suggestion so far.

Hey, I was the first one to suggest that yesterday!

updated OCT 24, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Thanks, Marisa, that's the most helpful suggestion so far.

updated OCT 24, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Solid colors = color liso
There are not other way to translate.
Fabrics are: telas de colores lisos (solid colors fabrics) o telas estampadas (printed fabrics).
If you want to buy a shirt in solid colors, just you have to ask for "una camiseta de color XXXX ".

updated OCT 24, 2008
posted by Marisa-Estrada
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Benaugusto, thanks for your input. You can see the problems with the modern textbooks that cater to students in the EE.UU. "Mira chica, compra esta blusa de un solo color porque hace juego con la falda que compraste la semana pasada." This is not correct'

updated OCT 23, 2008
posted by ltigo
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látigo said:

In the textbook En español, level two, they give us the word for "solid color" as "de un solo color". Is this not acceptable?


Well, not really látigo. If you advise some Spanish speaker to buy clothes "de un solo color," aren't you really telling them their clothes should be monochromatic? Meaning, for instance, their clothes should be all red, or blue, or whatever. And what you really intend to tell them is to buy solid colors (no patterns) so they can match clothes better.

updated OCT 23, 2008
posted by Benaugusto
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Gus said:

thank you for the answer, however it is not helping me. Would tell me what is the difference between Spanish and Catillian. I am not talking about spanenglish 'am talking about Spanish and Castillian. I got into a problem a while ago trying to explain the difference. Thank you for your kind help; I was send to the wood shed because of mine attempt. By the way, did you find a good word for solid color? Yes Gus, I did find several good words for "solid color." Thank you for your input.

As for the difference between Spanish and Castilian, when Columbus found the new world, queen Isabella of Castile (Castilla) decreed that the language to be spoken in the new lands should be her language, Castilian (castellano), which is technically the language spoken in Latin America today, and the main language spoken in Spain.

Many people argue there is no such single language as Spanish (español), since there are many languages spoken in Spain today: Castillian, Catalonian (catalán), Galician (gallego), Basque (vasco), Valencian (valenciano) and other dialects.

Benaugusto said:

Gus said:

¿español castizo? please, would you tell me what does that means.thank you

Linguistically speaking, "castizo" means pure Castilian, i.e. without "foreign" influences. For instance, you can say in Castilian "mi auto está en el estacionamiento" instead of "mi carro está en el parqueadero." In the last sentence, both "carro" and "parqueadero" are of English origin (

>

updated OCT 23, 2008
posted by Benaugusto
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In the textbook En español, level two, they give us the word for "solid color" as "de un solo color". Is this not acceptable'

updated OCT 23, 2008
posted by ltigo
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Gus said:

... about Spanish and Castillian. I got into a problem a while ago trying to explain the difference.
Focusing on that part of your question (and assuming that you mean explaining to a non-Spanish speaker: Meaning #2 is the most likely. People who don't speak Spanish at all are less likely to even know that there are other languages spoken in Spain. One of the first problems that learners of Spanish encounter is the ceceo/seseo issue. In that context, it is not uncommon to refer to the use of ceceo as "Castillian" and to seseo as "Spanish" (which when it's used in contrast to Castillian has to be understood as shorthand for Latin American Spanish).

Regulars in this forum are aware that for native-speakers (and fairly advanced students of Spanish) the pronunciation issues are relatively minor and are, as a practical matter, overshadowed by vocabulary regionalisms (but then we can be talking about several dozen "flavors" of Spanish). Beginners, however, usually start off with pronunciation being the big issue. If they're buying a computer based course they may need to choose "which Spanish" they want. If they're in school they may find that the pronunciation given in their textbooks differs from that used by their teacher, etc.

updated OCT 23, 2008
posted by samdie
0
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Thank you- I think

samdie said:

Gus said:

thank you for the answer, however it is not helping me. Would tell me what is the difference between Spanish and Catillian. I am not talking about spanenglish 'am talking about Spanish and Castillian. I got into a problem a while ago trying to explain the difference. Thank you for your kind help; I was send to the wood shed because of mine attempt.

I'd say that it depends on the context.1) The language (and especially the pronunciation) used in Castile and nearby areas; as opposed to Catalan, Gallego, Basque and, even, the pronunciation in Andalucia.2) The (official) language of Spain; usually as opposed to the variants found in Latin America.3) Simply a synonym for Spanish (wherever/however spoken).

>

updated OCT 23, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
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Gus said:

thank you for the answer, however it is not helping me. Would tell me what is the difference between Spanish and Catillian. I am not talking about spanenglish 'am talking about Spanish and Castillian. I got into a problem a while ago trying to explain the difference. Thank you for your kind help; I was send to the wood shed because of mine attempt.
I'd say that it depends on the context.
1) The language (and especially the pronunciation) used in Castile and nearby areas; as opposed to Catalan, Gallego, Basque and, even, the pronunciation in Andalucia.
2) The (official) language of Spain; usually as opposed to the variants found in Latin America.
3) Simply a synonym for Spanish (wherever/however spoken).

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by samdie
0
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lazarus1907 said:

Again, I must confess my ignorance in this respect. I know how to quantize a colour in several colour spaces, and in many mathematical forms, but I don't know what "solid colour" mean in either language. A good explanation (preferably mathematical) would certainly help.

The closest I can come to a mathematical explanation, is to quote Isaac Newton in his Principia Matematica when he was describing pure colors. He used the term "coloris unius" meaning "of a single color." In modern times, when talking about clothes fashion, people say "solid color."

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by Benaugusto
0
votes

thank you for the answer, however it is not helping me. Would tell me what is the difference between Spanish and Catillian. I am not talking about spanenglish 'am talking about Spanish and Castillian. I got into a problem a while ago trying to explain the difference. Thank you for your kind help; I was send to the wood shed because of mine attempt. By the way, did you find a good word for solid color?

Benaugusto said:

Gus said:

¿español castizo? please, would you tell me what does that means.thank you

Linguistically speaking, "castizo" means pure Castilian, i.e. without "foreign" influences. For instance, you can say in Castilian "mi auto está en el estacionamiento" instead of "mi carro está en el parqueadero." In the last sentence, both "carro" and "parqueadero" are of English origin (

>

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
votes

Gus said:

¿español castizo? please, would you tell me what does that means.thank you

Linguistically speaking, "castizo" means pure Castilian, i.e. without "foreign" influences. For instance, you can say in Castilian "mi auto está en el estacionamiento" instead of "mi carro está en el parqueadero." In the last sentence, both "carro" and "parqueadero" are of English origin (anglicismos).

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by Benaugusto
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