HomeQ&ATranslation - She ran into a door

Translation - She ran into a door

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Does "ella chocó con una puerta" work? Or should I use "correr" or another word instead of "con"'

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updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by wl-wong

25 Answers

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you could also use the word "en la puerta" as well

updated OCT 22, 2008
posted by addison
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Quentin said:

http://hybriskaracteres.blogspot.com/2006/11/y-qu-pasa-con-afuera-y...

Hope you can read Spanish, because here is a good explanation.

Nice link!! I got corrected on "afuera" once & wasn't sure why.

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Quentin said:

I appreciate the logic, but are you serious? Does Spanish never use adverbs redudundantly as we do'It raining out(side). I parked the car outside. What's the weather like outside? There is a car outside in the parking lot with its lights still on. He's playing outside in the yard. You don't use outside like this in any Spanish phrases?

Heidita said:

We do not use either fuera nor afuera, as it can certainly not snow inside . so that would be rather superfluous.


Quite serious, quentin, in most of your sentences we would not use outside at all:

raining out(side). Está lloviendo.

I parked the car outside.Aparqué el coche en la calle(as opposing inside to the garage)
What's the weather like outside? ¿Qué tiempo hace?
There is a car outside in the parking lot with its lights still on. Hay un coche en el parking....
He's playing outside in the yard. Está jugando en el patio.

You don't use outside like this in any Spanish phrases' Not in these sentences, no, you don't.

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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I appreciate the logic, but are you serious? Does Spanish never use adverbs redudundantly as we do?

It raining out(side). I parked the car outside. What's the weather like outside? There is a car outside in the parking lot with its lights still on. He's playing outside in the yard. You don't use outside like this in any Spanish phrases?

Heidita said:

We do not use either fuera nor afuera, as it can certainly not snow inside . so that would be rather superfluous.

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updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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but were you trying to rationalize it to us or talk yourself into it? hehe
you are right, you know. I began by making notes to myself, and realized how much time i used up doing it, so,, I posted it. Hopefully, I did not made too many mistakes.

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by 00769608
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wl wong said:

Actually, the entire sentence is, "she ran into a door when she saw snow outside"


Looks like a mistake for "She ran indoors when ..."

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by samdie
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To add some wood to the fire:

ella se dió con la puerta cuando quiso salir para ver la nieve.

We do not use either fuera nor afuera, as it can certainly not snow inside . so that would be rather superfluous.

darse con: to collide with

36. intr. Chocar, golpear contra algo. U. t. c. prnl. ¿Dónde te has dado? Aquellos dos se daban con furia

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Phew! Thanks for the detailed explanation, but were you trying to rationalize it to us or talk yourself into it? hehe

I think the original post was made because wi wong was translating Chocar as crashed and she crased with the door did not sound correct. That's why he was looking for a better way to say it. Since you chose to translate chocar as collide now the con sounds correct to us in Englsih.

Gus said:

it des not sounds right for some reason, so ella chocó con la puerta is stiil the one to use.Ella chocó, she collided with the door ella chocó con la puerta.

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updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Does "she ran into a door when she saw snow outside""ella chocó con una puerta" work? Or should I use "corer" or another word instead of "con"?

Corer means to run. In Eng. One can say, she ran into the door
In Spanish, one can't say this, because, there is no way to make it sound logically. Se corrió en la puerta, she ran in the door, nope
Se corrió contra la puerta,she ran against the door, I don't think so either

Se corrio detrás de la puerta...this means, she ran behind the door, if you take out the word se it makes sense se corrio detras de la puerta, meaning that suddenly she ran (she hide) behind the door.This makes sense, I mean, anyone will understand the sentence, although is not grammatically correct. However, she is not saying this, she is saying that the girl bump into the door not hide behind the door, So correr detras de la puerta the door is out.

This leave us with choco contra la puerta. Which means that she hit the door with her body, bump into the door.

Contra means against.. she collided against the door
Con means with (in this case) ella choco con una puerta. The problem with this is the word una'una in this case means one of the doors,,, una de las puertas.. Somehow, I don't think she means that, I think that she means, that she came out of the house thru a door,she saw the snow and ran back into the house by ways of the same door
So ella choco con la puerta Cuando vio la nieve makes sense.

Now La puerta le dió un bofetada cuando intentó salir afuera para mirar la nieve. La puerta salpped her, when she went out,,, this is possible. Some doors are spring loaded and if one gets distracted the door can close behind you very quickly and hit you on the back.
But the sentence says that the girl bump into the door. In other words she did the action she hit the door not the other way around. La puerta le dio una bofetada Cuando salio a ver la puerta is out.
So this still leaves us with the girl bump into the door. ella choco con la puerta.
Now contra means against, So its is possible to say, ella chocó contra la puerta- but it des not sounds right for some reason, so ella chocó con la puerta is stiil the one to use.
Ella chocó, she collided with the door ella chocó con la puerta.

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by 00769608
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Great!
My Spanish is quite limited, so it was awesome that you could clarify it.
Thanks again!

Good night/morning/afternoon (') ^_^

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by wl-wong
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All I got was from the explanations were that afuera deals with movement and fuera deals more with location viewed from where you are. In our case I think we want fuera because we are talking about the snow outside not her going outside. If we were talking about how she was trying to run outside then we would use afuera.

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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By the way Quentin, thanks a lot for the multiple replies you posted on this thread : )

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by wl-wong
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so according to the thread Quentin posted, I should use "fuera" for correct usage'

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by wl-wong
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http://hybriskaracteres.blogspot.com/2006/11/y-qu-pasa-con-afuera-y-fuera.html

Hope you can read Spanish, because here is a good explanation.

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Again, does anyone know the difference between "fuera" and "afuera"'

updated OCT 20, 2008
posted by wl-wong
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