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Malanga

1
vote

Just wondering what Malanga means, not sure that this is the correct spelling.....I work in a pub in DC where the whole kitchen is hispanic and I'm just trying to keep up! smile! Please help!

13474 views
updated JUL 16, 2013
posted by shannon2
There is no translation for this Potato like root that is eatened in Cuba, Spain and parts of Mexico and South America. American's don't eat it, so it's hard to find. You will have to travel to a Spanish store that carries such imported delicasies. - Captain_Cuba, AGO 9, 2010

12 Answers

1
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Thank you! I was just looking for a general meaning! I'm aware that words have many conitations, but wasn't looking to get that deep. My spanish is null, and working with a group of spanish speaking people I have been trying to learn some spanish to at least show them the respect that I am trying, and I was honestly just looking for a literal translation. I'm sorry if I appeared intrusive or primative! (But unfortunatley my spanish IS primative!!) Thank you for giving me a respectful answer! It's appreciated!

updated JUL 16, 2013
posted by shannon2
0
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Here's a nice answer: http://www.innvista.com/health/foods/vegetables/malanga.htm Make's you wonder if you got the word correct! Or if it has some kind of slang meaning separate from the main meaning. I'm pleasantly surprised to see it's a kind of 'Elephant Ear' (Xanthosoma). I grow a special type ('Lime Zinger') in the garden for ornamental reasons. --edit-- This explains the slang meaning: http://www.salsaforums.com/showthread.php?p=90064 . No wonder nobody wanted to answer wink

updated FEB 25, 2010
edited by jardinero
posted by jardinero
0
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Quentin said:

Well, in your case it's not that bad since the word's meaning is fairly straightforward. But most words can take on many meanings. We need them used in a sentence or a description of what was being discussed to fathom which spanish word to translate it as.

For instance if you asked what the Spanish word for "let" is, I would have to know if you meant let as to permit or allow , to rent, Let him alone (command), et al.

Acually I suppose the fact that you heard it in a pub was , at least, a hint in this case. Just try not to provide just the word and expect more than an educated guess as to its meaning.

This isn't so much a rule as a necessity. It's just requesting that you provide as much help as possible to insure that the reply is as helpful as it can be. No one wants to misinform you. In your case, when I first saw the word, I thought it was some verb form, not a noun.

http://exoticeatingexperiment.blogspot.com/2007/12/big-taro-root-or...

Google the word. Lots of pictures, even recipes.

Shannon said:

I'm sorry....what's that suppose to mean? I was just asking a simple question, I wasn't aware that there were "rules" to other people offering to help out....

And to further illustrate the point "malanga" is also an adjective in the caribbean meaning "thick" in an insulting sense.

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
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Shannon said:

I'm sorry....what's that suppose to mean? I was just asking a simple question, I wasn't aware that there were "rules" to other people offering to help out....

In addition to what others have said, context helps us guess a word when it is misspelled, and you yourself said you weren't sure of the spelling.

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Shannon said:

I'm sorry....what's that suppose to mean? I was just asking a simple question, I wasn't aware that there were "rules" to other people offering to help out....

Shannon, what does "GET" mean. Just to illustrate, I have four "fullscap" pages in my dictionary explaining in excess of 100 ways this word is used. Just read what the other members are saying.

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Shannon said:

I'm sorry....what's that suppose to mean? I was just asking a simple question, I wasn't aware that there were "rules" to other people offering to help out....

Shannon, it's a rule in the sense of "If you drive your car off the cliff, you'll probably crash" kind of rule.

Words (in English or Spanish) may have many different meanings depending on the context, and to get a good answer you need to provide as much context as possible.

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
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Thanks again! Like I said just trying to keep up in a completely hispanic kitchen! Thanks again for your help! I really appreciate it!

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by shannon2
0
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No hay de que. Don't mention it. No offense was taken. If I was curt in any way, I apologize. Just wanted to make you aware of the need for context.

Shannon said:

Thank you! I was just looking for a general meaning! I'm aware that words have many conitations, but wasn't looking to get that deep. My spanish is null, and working with a group of spanish speaking people I have been trying to learn some spanish to at least show them the respect that I am trying, and I was honestly just looking for a literal translation. I'm sorry if I appeared intrusive or primative! (But unfortunatley my spanish IS primative!!) Thank you for giving me a respectful answer! It's appreciated!

>

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

Well, in your case it's not that bad since the word's meaning is fairly straightforward. But most words can take on many meanings. We need them used in a sentence or a description of what was being discussed to fathom which spanish word to translate it as.

For instance if you asked what the Spanish word for "let" is, I would have to know if you meant let as to permit or allow , to rent, Let him alone (command), et al.

Acually I suppose the fact that you heard it in a pub was , at least, a hint in this case. Just try not to provide just the word and expect more than an educated guess as to its meaning.

This isn't so much a rule as a necessity. It's just requesting that you provide as much help as possible to insure that the reply is as helpful as it can be. No one wants to misinform you. In your case, when I first saw the word, I thought it was some verb form, not a noun.
http://exoticeatingexperiment.blogspot.com/2007/12/big-taro-root-or-malanga-coco.html

Google the word. Lots of pictures, even recipes.

Shannon said:

I'm sorry....what's that suppose to mean? I was just asking a simple question, I wasn't aware that there were "rules" to other people offering to help out....

>

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

acc. to the internet it's some kind of food. bet that's helpful

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by Chavag
0
votes

I'm sorry....what's that suppose to mean? I was just asking a simple question, I wasn't aware that there were "rules" to other people offering to help out....

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by shannon2
0
votes

The rule here is, if you don't provide context then you don't get much of an answer.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/malanga

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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