Lo, los, las, ect.

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Do you know what lo, los, la, las, le and les means? And what is the difference between them'

2240 views
updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by Cami

6 Answers

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Sargento Chinicuil said:

"LO" only applies for things.

I disagree.

He visto a tu hermano - Lo he visto.

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Hola!
The Lo,Los,La,Las are Plural froms of The .Lo, Los [ male] La ,Las [female] Gender and amount are the factors that give you the need for wich should be used

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by debby2
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Sargento,

plural, not plurar

I wouldn't bring it up, but I've seen you use it before.

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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For people you respect, instead of use "TE" (¿TE gustaría ir al parque? - Would YOU like to go to the park'), you use "LE" (¿LE gustaría ir al parque? - Would YOU like to go to the park') to show respect. This is only for singular YOU.

For plurar, is the same, is always "LES" (¿LES gustaría ir al parque? - Would YOU like to go to the park')

And something that lazarus1907 forgot, "LOS" applies for things & people (masculine) as well. "LO" only applies for things. For people (masculine) in singular we say "EL". "LA" & "LAS" is used for things & people (femenine) as well. It's very confused now that I realized the way we used them, I didn't realized that before. I hope I explained myself clearly, any doubt I'll be pleased to answer you.

updated OCT 16, 2008
posted by Sargento-Chinicuil
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Lazurus seems to have missed the le, les

I'll let you read the rules, but all his examples were pronouns used as a direct object of the verb.
The le, les are particular forms of pronouns used as an indirect objects of the verb..

See the grammar references on pronouns.

http://www.spanishdict.com/reference/grammar/indirect-object-pronouns
http://www.spanishdict.com/reference/grammar/direct-object-pronouns
http://www.spanishdict.com/reference/grammar/object-pronouns-together

updated OCT 15, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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Your question requires a very long answer. I'll give you a short one:

for masculine singular objects:

Tengo un libro (I have a book)
Lo tengo (I have it)

for feminine singular objects:

Tengo una casa (I have a house)
La
tengo (I have it)

for masculine plural objects:

Tengo unos libros (I have some books)
Los tengo (I have them)

for feminine singular objects:

Tengo unas casas (I have some houses)
Las tengo (I have them)

You'are probably wondering why we change from "lo" to "la" if in English is always "it", and why we change from "los" to "las", if in English is always "them". Well... many languages (probably over 50% of the planet) don't bother changing from "it" to "them" anyway (they don't change anything), and they communicate perfectly, so there you go.

updated OCT 15, 2008
posted by lazarus1907