Descalibrado, Destrio

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I don't seem to find these words in the dictionary. They relate to headings in a fruit quality report.

3099 views
updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by Russouw-Bester

12 Answers

1
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Descalibrado would be something not calibrated or out of calibration standards. This word is usually applied to measurement or testing equipment.

updated ENE 13, 2011
posted by 00e657d4
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And "descalabrado" is a word you would would never find in a technical document. Descalibrado makes sense in this context.

James Santiago said:

Could be a typing error. DescalAbrar means to damage or smash. Past participle would be "descalabrado"A translator should assume an error only if the original doesn't make sense, or if the other version makes much more sense than the original. Descalibrado, however, does make sense in this context, and I find numerous sites discussing the processing of fresh fruit in which the word is used, especially in the context of bagged fruit being over- or underweight because of uncalibrated machinery. The sizing of the fruit also needs to be calibrated, as does the sensing of defects such as bruises and spots.I see no reason to jump to the conclusion that there is an error here.

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updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by 00e657d4
0
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Could be a typing error. DescalAbrar means to damage or smash. Past participle would be "descalabrado"

A translator should assume an error only if the original doesn't make sense, or if the other version makes much more sense than the original. Descalibrado, however, does make sense in this context, and I find numerous sites discussing the processing of fresh fruit in which the word is used, especially in the context of bagged fruit being over- or underweight because of uncalibrated machinery. The sizing of the fruit also needs to be calibrated, as does the sensing of defects such as bruises and spots.

I see no reason to jump to the conclusion that there is an error here.

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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James Santiago said:

I don't think descalibrado is a typo. Calibrado can mean calibrated, graduated, or bored (as in a hole that has been bored), so des- would just be un- on these words. The exact meaning will be dictated by the context. Destrio means the sorting of fruit. See the following.

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/spanish_to_english/botany/2802500-en_dest...

Could be a typing error. DescalAbrar means to damage or smash. Past participle would be "descalabrado"

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Thank you James, you've put me on the right track. I am sorted now!

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by Russouw-Bester
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I don't know where the progressive and non-progressive are coming from, but absent any further context, I would just translate these as "unstable sorting" and "stable sorting." The machines that sort fruit are quite sophisticated today, and look for a variety of characteristics. Naturally, you want the machine to sort consistently. Here is a site that talks about such machines. Maybe reading through it will help you with some terminology.

http://www.compacsort.com/

However, having translated thousands of table headings in my life, I know that often it is impossible to know for sure what they mean. If you can't find a satisfactory answer, I recommend you contact your client and ask about these terms.

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I only looked at the site you referenced after I replied. Therefore Destrio = sorting of substandard fruit - OK. Would I then be correct with the assumption that "Estable" and "Inestable" would refer to the sorting of the fruit into non progressive (established) and progressive (not yet established) defects.

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by Russouw-Bester
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Did you look at the link I provided? Seems like the answer is right there. Sorting out substandard fruit. Then word it to fit your context.

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I have established the meaning of Descalibrado = out of calibration. I am still unable to determine the meaning of "Destrio". I get the feeling that it refers to non progressive and progressive factors when used with terms Estable and Inestable as in the headings below. Additional headings are as follows, with the English where known:
Spanish English Value
Barco Boat MOL VOLTA
Contenedor Container TGHU9905126
Fecha Date 28/08/2008
Semana Week 35
Almacen Warehouse SOLLANA
Id viaje Trip no 216942
Descalibrado Out of calibration 6%
Etiquetas fruta Fruit Labels no
Otros mater. Other Material Envoltorio (1ª capa)
Estable Destrio '? 13%
Inestable Destrio '? 22%
Podrido Rotted 1%

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by Russouw-Bester
0
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I don't think descalibrado is a typo. Calibrado can mean calibrated, graduated, or bored (as in a hole that has been bored), so des- would just be un- on these words. The exact meaning will be dictated by the context.

Destrio means the sorting of fruit. See the following.

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/spanish_to_english/botany/2802500-en_destrio.html

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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Natasha said:

It is probably that these are mis-spellings or typos. Could you provide a little more of the report (such as the other headings, for example)?

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updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by Russouw-Bester
0
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It is probably that these are mis-spellings or typos. Could you provide a little more of the report (such as the other headings, for example)'

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by Natasha