HomeQ&Ahow do you say i like cereal with honey

how do you say i like cereal with honey

0
votes

ok.. cereal is cereal. honey is miel. with im not sure... but i could say me gusta cereal y miel. but that could mean i like them seperately. how would i say i like to eat them mixed together?

and is there a word for granola?

and do people eat egg whites in the morning in spanish countries. how do you say egg white?

huevo blanco

o

clara de huevo

so much to learn!

3878 views
updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by harmony

15 Answers

0
votes

Le gusta (modifier like mi, este, el, etc + singular noun)
Le gusta este vestido.
Le gusta mi carro.
Le gusta el postre.
Plus, le gusta (singular) nadar.
Le gusta (singular) bailar, correr, leer, y cantar.
Le gusta (singular) proper noun= Le gusta Albuquerque

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by ltigo
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

Natasha said:

You can use con (with). Me gusta cereal con miel.

Remember the rule I gave the other day about using the definite article with the subject of the sentence? James hasn't forgotten it.

Of course I remembered. As soon as the A Student posted it the right way.

wink

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

harmony said:

how would i say got it! could i just say comprende for i understand?

You can say something like "(Ahora lo) entiendo" (the part in bracket is not necessary, but it is advisable).

harmony said:

this is so awesome.. i can ask questions and get help in the comfort of my home... casa... i have a very small vocabulary... tengo muy pequeño vocabulario... not yo tengo right?

Right! Avoid "yo".

In this case, if you want to sound more "native", you could say "Tengo (muy) poco vocabulario".

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

oh... got it... gracias!

how would i say got it! could i just say comprende for i understand?

this is so awesome.. i can ask questions and get help in the comfort of my home... casa... i have a very small vocabulary... tengo muy pequeño vocabulario... not yo tengo right?

lazarus1907 said:

harmony said:

thank you both... very helpful... so the verb says who your talking about so you can leave out the pronoun unless you want to emphasise...

Not really: you must leave it out unless you want to emphasize.

>

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by harmony
0
votes

what about saying quiero huevos for i want eggs... or do you have to say el huevos... cuz my friend didn't use the el...

As Master Laz told us recently, use the article if the noun is the subject of the sentence.

Quiero huevos.
Me gustan los huevos.

Of course, if you are talking about a specific noun, such as the huevos that you are pointing to on the menu, you can use the article.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

harmony said:

so the verb says who your talking about so you can leave out the pronoun unless you want to emphasise...

Yes and not: the verb does say says who your talking about, but you must leave the pronoun out unless you want to emphasize.

harmony said:

what about saying quiero huevos for i want eggs... or do you have to say el huevos... cuz my friend didn't use the el...

"Huevos" is an object, and unless this object is a very specific one you can identify and differentiate from others, it shouldn't have "el". Verbs like "gustar" behave differently in this respect, but so do they in any other sense.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

thank you both... very helpful... so the verb says who your talking about so you can leave out the pronoun unless you want to emphasise...

what about saying quiero huevos for i want eggs... or do you have to say el huevos... cuz my friend didn't use the el...

i love this site... people are so helpful and fast! smile

lazarus1907 said:

harmony said:

and also when you say i want something... do you say yo quiero ___| or just quiero\___|_ i hear it both ways

In Spanish, pronouns like "yo", "tú", "el"... are only used if there is a good reason, and normally there is no good reason, because the verb provides information about person and number:

quiero = I want

quieres = you want

queremos = we want

The use of these pronouns is generally justified because we want others to focus on this pronoun for a special reason:

Quiero comer = I want to eat

Yo quiero comer = I don't know about you, guys, but I want to eat. (This "I" has more stress, it is I, not you!)

You don't normally go telling people that it is you, you and only you want something, so it is best if you omit this pronoun, and leave it for when you really need to highlight it.

>

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by harmony
0
votes

that's what i though... never heard of spanish people eating egg whites... haha...

James Santiago said:

harmony said:

and also when you say i want something... do you say yo quiero ___| or just quiero\___|_ i hear it both ways

Yes, you'll hear it both ways, but the nuance is different. Generally, you don't need the subject pronoun, but adding it stresses the subject.

Your friend: Quiero huevos revueltos.

You: Yo quiero huevos revueltos solo con claras.

Here you are contrasting your order with your friend's. BTW, food is very culture-dependent, so ordering an egg-white omelet will probably get you some odd looks in other countries. Sort of like ordering toast with just the crust.

>

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by harmony
0
votes

James Santiago said:

Yes, you'll hear it both ways, but the nuance is different. Generally, you don't need the subject pronoun, but adding it stresses the subject.

James' Spanish is excellent, but I disagree on one point: it is not about not needing the pronoun; you must omit it if there is not a good reason for using it, or it sounds ridiculous. Let me try to explain:

In Spanish, pronouns like "yo", "tú", "él"... are only used if there is a good reason, and normally there is no good reason, because the verb provides information about person and number:

quiero = I want
quieres = you want
queremos = we want

The use of these pronouns is generally justified because we want others to focus on this pronoun for a special reason:

Quiero comer = I want to eat
Yo quiero comer = I don't know about you, guys, but I want to eat. (This "I" has more stress, it is I, not you!)

You don't normally go telling people that it is you, you and only you want something (like "I, me, myself want to eat"), so it is best if you omit this pronoun, and leave it for when you really need to highlight it. Try to picture "yo" in Spanish as if you asked the whole audience to look at you, while all the spotlights point right at you: that's the effect you get with "yo".

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

harmony said:

and also when you say i want something... do you say yo quiero ___| or just quiero\___|_ i hear it both ways

Yes, you'll hear it both ways, but the nuance is different. Generally, you don't need the subject pronoun, but adding it stresses the subject.

Your friend: Quiero huevos revueltos.
You: Yo quiero huevos revueltos solo con claras.

Here you are contrasting your order with your friend's. BTW, food is very culture-dependent, so ordering an egg-white omelet will probably get you some odd looks in other countries. Sort of like ordering toast with just the crust.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

and also when you say i want something... do you say yo quiero ___| or just quiero\___|_ i hear it both ways

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by harmony
0
votes

i was talking to a venuzuelan friend who said to say "yo quiero huevos ruvueltos solo con claras" for i want scrambled egg whites

but do you say el before the noun? that's what the video says, but people tend to leave it out... is that ok just not proper'

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by harmony
0
votes

Natasha said:

You can use con (with). Me gusta cereal con miel.

Remember the rule I gave the other day about using the definite article with the subject of the sentence? James hasn't forgotten it.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Me gusta el cereal con miel.

In Latin America, granola is granola.

Egg whites = claras de huevo

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

You can use con (with). Me gusta cereal con miel.

I think "clara de huevo" is right, but we'll see. How would you say that in the plural form'

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Natasha
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