quechua, a misunderstood conception/language

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does anyone know this langauge to know what it says?

Imaynamá shayanay? ÿogapas yuyarisqaykin nchik Challay, munani sunchik kuska, kani qaylla sunqullay.

it would be very helpful.

10424 views
updated NOV 8, 2008
posted by ana2

16 Answers

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Hola cherryl. muy interesante tu comentario sobre las diferecias en la pronunciacion del idioma quechua, existen al rededor de 60 diferentes formas de hablar el quechua, solamente en el peru, sin contar con los otros paises, como ecuador, bolivia, y el norte argentino. pero el texto de ana esta mal escrito, no importa en cual de las secenta diferentes formas o maneras de hablar el quechua, alguien que conoce el idioma, lo reconocera de inmediato , le recomende a ana que me emviara el texto completo y correctamente escrito para poder traducirlo, es muy simple, claro para el quechua hablante., ha! no estas tan mal en historia, te felicito.

updated NOV 8, 2008
posted by WILBER---L---ARCE
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Hola ANA, primeramente esta mal escrito, segundo el quechua no, se puede traducir literalmente, enviame el texto correctamente y lo hare con muchisimo gusto.

updated NOV 8, 2008
posted by WILBER---L---ARCE
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Hi Ana, A friend of mine speaks Quechua or as it is also spelled Kechwa, I will ask him and get back to you.Quechua is the indigenous language of the Andean people and was the Official language of the Inca Empire although it was a bit different way back then , it varied by region and also different dialects within a region. The difference between Quechua and Spanish is like night and day as there are no linguistical similarities at all, the Spanish language was forced upon the Andean/Inca people who until that time only spoke Quechua or Ayamara (the latter in Bolivia) by the invading Spanish Inquisition under Francisco Pizarro who was by accounts illerate.

updated NOV 8, 2008
posted by Cheryl-Millard
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Ana, look up the Peruvian or Bolivian embassy on the Net, and write to them with your question, in suitably polite language. I have asked simple language questions to embassies and consulates many times, and have found that the people there are usually very friendly and happy to help out. Just remember that you are imposing on their time and goodwill, and be appropriately effusive in expressing your thanks.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Try searching the forum for quechua. I know there is someone (who used to be here anyway) who spoke it well enough to translate something once before. I believe it was someone in Spain, oddly enough

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by The-Steve
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i just wish tthis was simple.
but is life every simple?
no.

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by ana2
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ana said:

i was very curious because one of my friends decided to put me upon this mission of finding out what it meants. he speaks spanish, and is from peru. so i had a notion that it went with one another. but maybe my assumption was way off.

Quechua is spoken roughly by 1 in 10 inhabitants in Peru, which is not surprising, considering that the Inca civilization began in Peru. But in any case, if Quechua was related to Spanish, it would be related to English too. Did you not think of that? Sorry for keep asking, but I am very curious myself.

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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i was very curious because one of my friends decided to put me upon this mission of finding out what it meants. he speaks spanish, and is from peru. so i had a notion that it went with one another. but maybe my assumption was way off.

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by ana2
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Search for "Quechua" in the Search Forum box. It won't translate the above for you, but you will see that every once in a while someone posts a Quechua question on here (out of desperation, I assume).

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by Natasha
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There are about 10 million people speaking the language in America, but maybe none in this forum. Where did you find that text? Does my pitiful attempt on translation make any sense in that context? Can you answer my question regarding your believe about the similitude between languages'

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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it will remains a mystery, i guess.
ive spent the whole day trying to find out what it means, things like these will bug me for the longest time.
i did not know of any dictionary translations. i tried looking.
and how can i find out if anyone speaks quechua? that would be amazing if someone did.

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by ana2
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Checking a few words in a dictionary, hopefully it says something about "await", "we love together", and the last part maybe something like "I am... close in the heart'''" Just a wild guess, since you haven't even provided a context, and I speak no Quechua whatsoever. Wait see if anyone speaks Quechua.

By the way, what made you think that Quechua could be related to Spanish? I'm curious.

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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hmm...that is very interesting.

this might be a rhetorical question to ask, but you dont have a clue what it might mean, correct?
would anyone here'

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by ana2
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ana said:

is it not closely related to spanish?

As much as English and Swahili: nothing!

It was the language spoken by the Incas before the Spaniards conquered parts of America; the native Americans learnt Spanish, but some kept some words of their local dialects, and in some parts they are still spoken. If USA invaded Chinese, that wouldn't mean that Chinese are English are closely related.

Quechua is closer in structure to Turkish or Japanese than it is to Spanish: it is agglutinative, and the verb comes at the end. It is phonetically more complex than Spanish, and has more cases than any Indoeuropean language has ever had.

English is very closely related to Spanish, compared to Quechua.

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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is it not closely related to spanish'

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by ana2