awareness

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How would you say "the clarity of awareness is the source of mental stability and a balanced view" '

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updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by nomi

11 Answers

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La claridad de conciencia es la fuente de la estabilidad mental y el punto de vista equilibrada.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by melissa4
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Natasha said:

Eddy said:

Sorry Natasha, you can say "ships swing", or anything else for that matter, it just doesn´t make any sense in English.

Oh shut up.

Charming!!!

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Rob said:

Lots of ways to use that sentence in English as metaphor, or if you were a hip cat back in the fifties you might say, 'Man I could hear those ships swing all night long.'

Ha ha ha. I don´t know if English language learners are going to "get" that one.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Eddy said:

Sorry Natasha, you can say "ships swing", or anything else for that matter, it just doesn´t make any sense in English.

Oh shut up.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Natasha said:

samdie said:

Natasha said:

Ships don't swing. (I have this funny mental image of an ocean liner on a child's swing / columpio.) roll or heave, maybe. Well, you could say "With a change in the rudder, the ship swung leeward," but you need more to the sentence than just "Ships swing."

Ships don't but boats can; as in "to swing at anchor". However, Lazarus' "Los barcos se balancean" is probably "Ships roll" (I'd never heard this before).

Here it is from the dictionary:

pronomial verb

  1. to swing (en columpio, hamaca); to sway (de pie); to rock (en cuna, mecedora); to roll (barco)

So: Ships roll, or ships sway. --But you cannot say "ships swing" as a standalone sentence.

Sorry Natasha, you can say "ships swing", or anything else for that matter, it just doesn´t make any sense in English.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Eddy
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samdie said:

Natasha said:

Ships don't swing. (I have this funny mental image of an ocean liner on a child's swing / columpio.) roll or heave, maybe. Well, you could say "With a change in the rudder, the ship swung leeward," but you need more to the sentence than just "Ships swing."

Ships don't but boats can; as in "to swing at anchor". However, Lazarus' "Los barcos se balancean" is probably "Ships roll" (I'd never heard this before).

Here it is from the dictionary:

pronomial verb
1. to swing (en columpio, hamaca); to sway (de pie); to rock (en cuna, mecedora); to roll (barco)

So: Ships roll, or ships sway. --But you cannot say "ships swing" as a standalone sentence.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Natasha said:

Ships don't swing. (I have this funny mental image of an ocean liner on a child's swing / columpio.) roll or heave, maybe. Well, you could say "With a change in the rudder, the ship swung leeward," but you need more to the sentence than just "Ships swing."
Ships don't but boats can; as in "to swing at anchor". However, Lazarus' "Los barcos se balancean" is probably "Ships roll" (I'd never heard this before).

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by samdie
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lazarus1907 said:

LadyDi said:

...la claridad de conciencia es la fuente de la estabilidad mental y el punto de vista balanceado...

I don't know if this is one of those regional variations, but "balanceado" sounds like it is swinging to me. I'd definitely say "equilibrado".

Balance, in Latin, meant originally "two dishes" (from the old beam balance), one weight on each side of the arm, that swung until they both matched. English took the word with the idea of equilibrium once the swinging stopped (with two identical weights), and Spanish took the word to try to achieve this equilibrium by swinging. Equilibrio ("equal libra", same weight) is what we use when things are equal in the right amount. "Los barcos se balancean" (ships swing). At least that's how I see it.

Ships don't swing. (I have this funny mental image of an ocean liner on a child's swing / columpio.) roll or heave, maybe. Well, you could say "With a change in the rudder, the ship swung leeward," but you need more to the sentence than just "Ships swing."

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Thanks for your input Lazarus. That's why I joined this site. I know I still have a lot to learn in Spanish despite being "somewhat" fluent.

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by LadyDi
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LadyDi said:

...la claridad de conciencia es la fuente de la estabilidad mental y el punto de vista balanceado...

I don't know if this is one of those regional variations, but "balanceado" sounds like it is swinging to me. I'd definitely say "equilibrado".

Balance, in Latin, meant originally "two dishes" (from the old beam balance), one weight on each side of the arm, that swung until they both matched. English took the word with the idea of equilibrium once the swinging stopped (with two identical weights), and Spanish took the word to try to achieve this equilibrium by swinging. Equilibrio ("equal libra", same weight) is what we use when things are equal in the right amount. "Los barcos se balancean" (ships swing). At least that's how I see it.

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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...la claridad de conciencia es la fuente de la estabilidad mental y el punto de vista balanceado...

updated OCT 12, 2008
posted by LadyDi