Agarros los bigotes'que llega Ratigone!

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I would like a translation of this children's book title. It doesn't make sense to me. Here is a link to the book cover.

http://www.phoenixbookcompany.com/cartgenie/prod-640.htm

4644 views
updated ENE 31, 2009
posted by marianne2

27 Answers

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Agreed, Janice, has to be a typo.

Janice said:

I am extremely interested and reading this post, Lazarus, hanging on every word from beginning to end. It has come just at the right time for me as I learn these imperative forms.

So I have to pause here and ask if you don't perhaps mean "2nd person plural" in this post. I feel certain that you wrote 3rd person just being in a hurry and that it was an oversight.

Please tell me that I am correct because otherwise it is back to square one for me as far as understanding this all goes.

lazarus1907 said:

Look at the previous posts, James: the third person plural of the imperative always drops the "d" in these cases. Arrepentid - arrepentíos Esperad - esperaos

Lavad - lavaos

Dormid - Dormíos

Vestid - vestíos

Other things worth pointing out: the plural forms of the imperative (including the subjunctive ones) drop the "s" before "nos" and "se":

Demos - démonos - demóselo

Digamos - digámoselo

Vistamos - vistámonos

>

updated ENE 31, 2009
posted by Natasha
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I am extremely interested and reading this post, Lazarus, hanging on every word from beginning to end. It has come just at the right time for me as I learn these imperative forms.

So I have to pause here and ask if you don't perhaps mean "2nd person plural" in this post. I feel certain that you wrote 3rd person just being in a hurry and that it was an oversight.

Please tell me that I am correct because otherwise it is back to square one for me as far as understanding this all goes.

lazarus1907 said:

Look at the previous posts, James: the third person plural of the imperative always drops the "d" in these cases. Arrepentid - arrepentíos

Esperad - esperaos

Lavad - lavaos

Dormid - Dormíos

Vestid - vestíos

Other things worth pointing out: the plural forms of the imperative (including the subjunctive ones) drop the "s" before "nos" and "se":

Demos - démonos - demóselo

Digamos - digámoselo

Vistamos - vistámonos

>

updated ENE 30, 2009
posted by Janice
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Quentin said:

:

Apocopated There's a grammar term you don't run across every day.

Somehow I don't think that's going to be coming out on the improve-your-vocabulary calendars this season!

updated OCT 11, 2008
posted by Natasha
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  1. Apocopated Verb Forms before the Reflexive Pronouns.

a. The final -d of the imperative plural is dropped before the reflexive os:

figuraos (not figurados), imagine.
Lavaos las manos, niños. Wash your hands, children.
1. But always: idos, go away.

b. The final -s of the present subjunctive used as positive imperative is dropped before the reflexive nos:

alegrémonos (not alegrémosnos), let us rejoice.

Apocopated There's a grammar term you don't run across every day.

Natasha said:

lazarus1907 said:

James Santiago said:

Fourth, I think the word agarraos is slang for agarrados, so the Spanish would mean something like "Hang onto your whiskers...Rigatoni's coming!"

Sorry, James, a slang you said? "Agarraos" is the standard pronominal imperative form in Spain; the one you would use if you were to write a formal text, and the one we use when we speak. Does it not make sense in imperative? In Spain we often say things like:¡Agarraos, que no os vais a creer lo que ha pasado!

Just for this verb, or a general rule to drop the d if os is affixed to the end of the command?

>

updated OCT 11, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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scapeuce said:

James, I think that agarraos more than slang is Ancient Spanish, same as amaos ( instead of ámense) retiraos (instead of retírense) , reclinaos (instead of reclínense). This kind of verbal form is used in religious books.

Ancient? Religious? What are you talking about? Read the previous posts: it is still used in Spain. I talk like that, and I am not that old.

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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James Santiago said:

First, the link you gave is useless because the writing is illegible.Second, you've got the spelling wrong. It's agarraos and Rigatoni. See the following site.http://www.amazon.com/Agarraos-Bigotes-Rigatoni-Geronimo-Stilton/dp...Third, the title of the English translation is Watch Your Whiskers, Stilton!Fourth, I think the word agarraos is slang for agarrados, so the Spanish would mean something like "Hang onto your whiskers...Rigatoni's coming!"


James, I think that agarraos more than slang is Ancient Spanish, same as amaos ( instead of ámense) retiraos (instead of retírense) , reclinaos (instead of reclínense). This kind of verbal form is used in religious books.

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by scapeuce
0
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James Santiago said:

First, the link you gave is useless because the writing is illegible.Second, you've got the spelling wrong. It's agarraos and Rigatoni. See the following site.http://www.amazon.com/Agarraos-Bigotes-Rigatoni-Geronimo-Stilton/dp...Third, the title of the English translation is Watch Your Whiskers, Stilton!Fourth, I think the word agarraos is slang for agarrados, so the Spanish would mean something like "Hang onto your whiskers...Rigatoni's coming!"


James, I think that agarraos more than slang is Ancient Spanish, same as amaos ( instead of ámense) retiraos (instead of retírense) , reclinaos (instead of reclínense). This kind of verbal form is used in religious books.

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by scapeuce
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Sorry, James, but I've been experiencing problems with my Internet connection for the last two hours or so: every single new page was taking ages, so I skipped your link.

By the way, all the imperative forms of "agarrarse" are incorrect, not only the "agarraos" one. The present participle is incorrect too: it should have been "agarrándome/-te/-se/-nos/-os/-se".

P.S. I've checked other reflexive verbs, and none of them follow the rules I stated above about dropping the "d" and the "s", and the accents are all missing.

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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lazarus1907 said:

James Santiago said:

So, does that mean the conjugation site was in error (again)?

I didn't know this site could conjugate both "agarrar" and "agarrarse". Yes, it is another mistake.

You didn't look at the link I gave! That would have cleared up everything a lot faster, because you would have seen right away why I made the decision I did.

It's frustrating that there are so many mistakes, which make the conjugation site unreliable and therefore not really useful. I took the time to check my facts before posting, but the error on the site, and my unfamiliarity with the vosotros form, led me astray. I could have given the perfect answer if I had been able to obtain the correct information.

Arrrggghh!

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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James Santiago said:

So, does that mean the conjugation site was in error (again)?

I didn't know this site could conjugate both "agarrar" and "agarrarse". Yes, it is another mistake.

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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So, does that mean the conjugation site was in error (again)'

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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látigo said:

A typo in demóselo- should be démoselo.

Too much copy+paste. Thanks.

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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A typo in demóselo- should be démoselo.

lazarus1907 said:

Look at the previous posts, James: the third person plural of the imperative always drops the "d" in these cases.Arrepentid - arrepentíosEsperad - esperaosLavad - lavaosDormid - DormíosVestid - vestíosOther things worth pointing out: the plural forms of the imperative (including the subjunctive ones) drop the "s" before "nos" and "se":Demos - démonos - demóseloDigamos - digámoseloVistamos - vistámonos

>

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by ltigo
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It is reflexive construction and for agarrarse-the affirmative in vosotros is agarraos, "d" is dropped (Lazarus stated the rule). Note that dormirse= dormíos has an accent to preserve the stressed syllable.

James Santiago said:

No conjugation site gives pronominal forms,I'm not sure what you mean. The site I linked to gives conjugations for agarrarse. Isn't that the verb here'this is "agarrad + os".Yes, I know that. That's why I gave it. But because the word agarraos has no D, I thought it must be something else. So, what verb and what conjugation is agarraos? I thought os was like "tes," that is, informal plural of second person. (And, yes, I know there is no such word as tes.)

>

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by ltigo
0
votes

Look at the previous posts, James: the third person plural of the imperative always drops the "d" in these cases.

Arrepentid - arrepentíos
Esperad - esperaos
Lavad - lavaos
Dormid - Dormíos
Vestid - vestíos

Other things worth pointing out: the plural forms of the imperative (including the subjunctive ones) drop the "s" before "nos" and "se":

Demos - démonos - demóselo
Digamos - digámoselo
Vistamos - vistámonos

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907