vamos a ver

2
votes

I would like to know what vamos a ver means in english...
Please reply if you can help me out..
thanks,
cee cee

52068 views
updated FEB 26, 2014
posted by cee-cee-collin
Hola,
Vamos a ver, means "let's see". But is used in different ways sometime.
"English "

13 Answers

3
votes

Hola,

I am Javier from Spain, and I have decided to join just to help a little bit to anybody who want to learn Spanish. "Vamos a ver" means "Let's see" when is used alone. If you used with something else like a place then it means "we are going to see or visit" For example: "Vamos a ver el castillo" means "We are going to see the castle". ("ver" means "see" but in here is used as visit also).

If you used with something else like an object like pictures it can be use like an starter to call the attention or ask for it. example: "Vamos a ver esas fotos" "Let's see that pictures"

But if you go to a room to have a discusion with someone you can start with "¡Vamos a ver! ¿Que quieres? " Just to say: "Ok, What do you want?" I hope it explains a little bit more this complex expression.

Javier

updated FEB 26, 2014
posted by Javier_Spain
Hi Javier , great to see you again , terrific answer it explains it all in simple terms which is often missing from so many people today. Thanks mate.
Lazarus was the M A N, I wish he was still here .
Sometimes - in Bolivia at least - it is shortened to "a ver" = let's see or let me see.
2
votes

We'll see or Let's see.

updated FEB 27, 2014
posted by tuscantory
1
vote

Hi Cee Cee, I think that "vamos a ver" means "we are going to see".
Hopefully this will help you.

Marco

updated MAR 12, 2012
posted by Marco-T
Lets see
1
vote

A golfing friend fell, punctured his lung and fractured his ribs the other day. He sent me an e-mail saying he wouldn't be playing in the next tournament. At the end of his message he wrote: Vamos a ver.
So, after learning from you and Marco what the meaning could be in English, I assume my friend was saying something like, "whatever, we will see" or "we will see, whatever happens".

By the way, I'm glad I stumbled across this site...I have several Mexican employees and I am trying to learn how to communicate with them at least a little bit in spanish.

Thank you so much,
Muchas Gracias

lazarus1907 said:

cee cee collin said:

Muchas gracias...?

Depending on the context it can also mean "Let's see". Please provide context.

>

updated DIC 30, 2011
posted by cee-cee-collin
1
vote

samdie said:

To the best of my knowledge, you can always use "vámonos" and be understood and, even people who might, themselves, say "vamos" won't think it odd (it's just your basic "standard" Spanish). I wonder if "vamos" isn't a bit like when (in very colloquial English) we say "I'm outta here!" (i.e. "I am out of here!"). We switch from (what, at least in Latin grammar is known as the "hortatory subjunctive" [exhorting others to do something]) to a simple declarative sentence in the present tense but the intent is often to encourage others to do the same.

Not really: they are different verbs, and they are both correct.

Vamos = Let's go, when the focus is on the destination.
Vámonos = Let's go/leave, when the focus is on leaving the starting point, regardless of whether we know were we are going next or not.

The "vamos" form, which looks present, is actually an exception in the conjugation, because it resembles the present, but it is actually a subjunctive form. In the Middle ages, the verb "ir" had two subjunctives for "Let us go", and the unusual "vamos" became the preferred one over the most logical "vayamos", which is hardly used.

updated DIC 30, 2011
posted by lazarus1907
That is really interesting. Thank you, Lazarus!
Drek! I have trouble believing that I said that. Fortunately, Lazarus caught it and provided a better analysis.
1
vote

The best answer for this question is : Vamos a ver = Let's see or we will see!!!!! , I hope that it helps you!!!! grin grin

updated DIC 30, 2011
posted by Safary98
Quite, that's surely enough?
0
votes

Marco said:

:

Is "maestro/a" the common way to express "teacher" in Spanish? :D

It's mu understanding from previous discussions here that maestro / maestra works fine, as does profesor / profesora.

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Marco said:

I think "vamos" is used in Latin American, but isn't used in all Latin countries.

I would like to know which one is the most common expression for me to say and that is understood by all Spanish people.
To the best of my knowledge, you can always use "vámonos" and be understood and, even people who might, themselves, say "vamos" won't think it odd (it's just your basic "standard" Spanish). I wonder if "vamos" isn't a bit like when (in very colloquial English) we say "I'm outta here!" (i.e. "I am out of here!"). We switch from (what, at least in Latin grammar is known as the "hortatory subjunctive" [exhorting others to do something]) to a simple declarative sentence in the present tense but the intent is often to encourage others to do the same.

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

Marco said:

I guess that "vamos" is not commonly used to refer "let's go" in Spain. Am I right? What do you guys use when you want to express "let's go"'I think "vamos" is used in Latin American, but isn't used in all Latin countries. I would like to know which one is the most common expression for me to say and that is understood by all Spanish people.

>

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

cee cee collin said:

Muchas gracias...?

Depending on the context it can also mean "Let's see". Please provide context.

Hi lazarus,

I read one post yesterday regarding "vámonos". Some one posted one question about "let's go". I remember that there are several ways to say it depending on which countries you are in.
I guess that "vamos" is not commonly used to refer "let's go" in Spain. Am I right? What do you guys use when you want to express "let's go"?
I think "vamos" is used in Latin American, but isn't used in all Latin countries.
I would like to know which one is the most common expression for me to say and that is understood by all Spanish people.
Would you have any ideas or suggestions?

Muchas gracias por tu ayuda, mi maestro.

P.S: Is "maestro/a" the common way to express "teacher" in Spanish? :D

Marco

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by Marco-T
0
votes

cee cee collin said:

A golfing friend fell, punctured his lung and fractured his ribs the other day. He sent me an e-mail saying he wouldn't be playing in the next tournament. At the end of his message he wrote: Vamos a ver.So, after learning from you and Marco what the meaning could be in English, I assume my friend was saying something like, "whatever, we will see" or "we will see, whatever happens".By the way, I'm glad I stumbled across this site...I have several Mexican employees and I am trying to learn how to communicate with them at least a little bit in spanish.Thank you so much,Muchas Gracias

lazarus1907 said:

cee cee collin said:

Muchas gracias...?

Depending on the context it can also mean "Let's see". Please provide context.

Hi Cee Cee, I think that "vamos a ver" here means "let's see" after you gave us the context. Your friend was trying to say that "let's see what's going to happen".

Marco

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by Marco-T
0
votes

cee cee collin said:

Muchas gracias...?

Depending on the context it can also mean "Let's see". Please provide context.

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Muchas grasias...?
Thank you very much,
Cee Cee

updated OCT 10, 2008
posted by cee-cee-collin