los bares de copas

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what does this mean

5771 views
updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by bree-zarate

7 Answers

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In modern-day New York all bars are required (by law) to serve food. However, it may be nothing more than a plain cheese sandwich. A great many restaurants here have a "bar area" (where it's usually possible to order from a reduced menu [as compared to what's available when sitting at a table]). Restaurants with no bar area are usually referred to as "family restaurants" although that term can also be applied to those with a bar area.

updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by samdie
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James Santiago said:

But, Natasha, if someone said to you, "Let's go to a bar," what would you imagine about the place? I contend (see other thread) that you would imagine a place where people are sitting and drinking, not eating. Of course, as with most things, there may be specific exceptions to this general rule, but I think it is quite well established as a general rule. Most restaurants serve alcohol, so there is probably a continuum between bar and restaurant, but a bar generally either prohibits or discourages minors from entering. If your two examples do not do this (that is, if children are often present), then I would not call them bars.

Well, the usual formula in the name is "Restaurant and Bar" or "Bar and Grill," etc. So you have two meanings for bar. (1) The actual bar (in the restaurant, tavern, whatever) where drinks are on tap & served. (2) Bar meaning the pub, tavern, whatever.

If you just said "Let's go to the bar," fine, your point stands. But if you said "Let's not go to the same old place for Happy Hour -- what bar around here has good food'" that would make perfectly good sense, too.

updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by Natasha
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James Santiago said:

Interesting. That is exactly what bar means in English. If the place serves substantial food as well as alcoholic beverages, it would be called a restaurant, diner, etc., but not a bar.

In Spain, at least, a bar is a place with a bar (surprise!) around which where people stand to drink, or eat if they have snacks or serve meals. Optionally, but not necessarily, there could be some tables and chairs, and main meals could be offered; only when the main focus is the meals is called a restaurant.

updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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But, Natasha, if someone said to you, "Let's go to a bar," what would you imagine about the place? I contend (see other thread) that you would imagine a place where people are sitting and drinking, not eating. Of course, as with most things, there may be specific exceptions to this general rule, but I think it is quite well established as a general rule. Most restaurants serve alcohol, so there is probably a continuum between bar and restaurant, but a bar generally either prohibits or discourages minors from entering. If your two examples do not do this (that is, if children are often present), then I would not call them bars.

updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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James Santiago said:

lazarus1907 said:

In Spanish, some "bars" (originally an English word) also serve snaks and full meals. "Bares de copas" are the ones where only drinks are served ("copas" here refers to drinking, like in 'copa de vino' = "cup" of wine)

Interesting. That is exactly what bar means in English. If the place serves substantial food as well as alcoholic beverages, it would be called a restaurant, diner, etc., but not a bar.

Not here. Two examples of bars in St. Louis where people are known to go to eat, not necessarily to drink or just to drink: Hot Shots, Maryland Yards.

Of course, us aliens don't have any credibility . . . he he

updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by Natasha
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lazarus1907 said:

In Spanish, some "bars" (originally an English word) also serve snaks and full meals. "Bares de copas" are the ones where only drinks are served ("copas" here refers to drinking, like in 'copa de vino' = "cup" of wine)

Interesting. That is exactly what bar means in English. If the place serves substantial food as well as alcoholic beverages, it would be called a restaurant, diner, etc., but not a bar.

updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

In Spanish, some "bars" (originally an English word) also serve snaks and full meals. "Bares de copas" are the ones where only drinks are served ("copas" here refers to drinking, like in 'copa de vino' = "cup" of wine)

updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by lazarus1907