tiene

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votes

What does the Spanish word "tiene" mean in English

5185 views
updated ENE 16, 2009
posted by Maria-Russell

9 Answers

1
vote

James Santiago said:

he/she/you have

....just a little fix ..."he/she has" translate to "el/ella tiene" but "you have " translate to "tu tienes" (singular) OR "ustedes tienen" (plural)

updated ABR 9, 2013
posted by scapeuce
1
vote

scapeuce said:

James Santiago said:

he/she/you have

....just a little fix ..."he/she has" translate to "el/ella tiene" but "you have " translate to "tu tienes" (singular) OR "ustedes tienen" (plural)


(usted) tiene has been removed from the Spanish language'!

updated ABR 9, 2013
posted by samdie
0
votes

Maria Russell said:

Cecelia Adams said:

Maria, "Tiene" means he has, she has, it has, or You have (formal). The infinitive is tener and it means to have.

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updated ENE 16, 2009
posted by Maria-Russell
0
votes

Cecelia Adams said:

Maria, "Tiene" means he has, she has, it has, or You have (formal). The infinitive is tener and it means to have.

>

updated ENE 16, 2009
posted by Maria-Russell
0
votes

Maria, "Tiene" means he has, she has, it has, or You have (formal). The infinitive is tener and it means to have.

updated OCT 9, 2008
posted by Cecelia-Adams
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You are completely right ... I missed it....that's day by day a more formal way to address a person, but it is the safest way if you are in doubt...... also in Spain it is common to say "vosotros teneis", but in South America this is extremely formal (almost oldfashioned) ... I am used to say "vosotros" because I work for a spaniard corporation.

samdie said:

scapeuce said:

James Santiago said:

he/she/you have

....just a little fix ..."he/she has" translate to "el/ella tiene" but "you have " translate to "tu tienes" (singular) OR "ustedes tienen" (plural)

(usted) tiene has been removed from the Spanish language'!

>

updated OCT 9, 2008
posted by scapeuce
0
votes

In addition to be "basic" meaning (for "tener") of "to have" there are lots of idiomatic expressions involving "tener" for which the usual English translation does not use the word "have" e.g. "tener hambre"=""to be hungry"; "tener sueño"="to be sleepy"; "tener miedo"="to be afraid"; etc.

updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by samdie
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HI María, look at the infinitive tener

updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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votes

he/she/you have

updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by 00bacfba