HomeQ&AThe difference between "ir" and "irse"

The difference between "ir" and "irse"

2
votes

In some Spanish tv shows I've seen, "ir" is made reflexive, for instance, someone might say "y ahora me voy" What is the difference between ir and irse, and when should the reflexive version be used'

32558 views
updated ABR 23, 2010
posted by Rachel

4 Answers

6
votes

This is the difference in a nutshell:

ir focuses on the destination
irse focuses on the starting point

Therefore, "ir" usually goes with prepositions indicating destination, like "a" or "hacia". It also used to indicate the transport used (en tren, a pie,...), but there is always a implicit. destination. The starting point is optional. In "Siempre vamos al cine los viernes"; the destination is the cinema, but there is no information regarding the starting point. You can also say "Vamos de Madrid a Segovia", indicating also the starting point, but the important thing is still the destination.

"Irse" assumes there is a starting point, from where we leave, so it normally uses prepositions like "de" or "desde" to indicate this. The destination is optional. Thus, if you say "me voy", the starting point is "here" (where you are when you say it), but the destination is not stated. In "Me voy al bar" there is also a destination, but the starting point, here, is still there, and it is the main focus.

"Irse" is often translated as "to leave".

updated OCT 1, 2014
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Rachel said:

That does clear some things up. Correct me if I got the wrong impression, but is irse, in the context I gave, used when talking about leaving, or removing yourself from a place, rather than simply "going'" Are there any specifics or rules you know of that could help me when it comes to applying the different versions of the verb?

"irse" is often translated as "go away."

ahora me voy = now I'm leaving

updated OCT 8, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

That does clear some things up. Correct me if I got the wrong impression, but is irse, in the context I gave, used when talking about leaving, or removing yourself from a place, rather than simply "going'" Are there any specifics or rules you know of that could help me when it comes to applying the different versions of the verb'

updated OCT 7, 2008
posted by Rachel
0
votes

I'm looking forward to this explanation, but first look at our dictionary definitions. Notice the definitions of ir as an intransitive verb, irse as a pronomial verb, a neutral verb, and as a reflexive verb.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/ir

updated OCT 7, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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