Curriculum Vitae in english

0
votes

Hello, every one, I just finished my Curriculum Vitae, I would love you to check if I'm missing some details or if I should add something else. Thanks in advance!

Wilfredo Ibáñez Zamora
San josé,
Cell:
email

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Date of Birth:
Citizenship:
Id number:
Sex:
Marital Status:

EMPLOYMENT HISTORY
EDUCATION

' High School:

' Instituto Jiménez:

' Academia Shakespeare:

SKILLS AND ABILITIES

' Computing skills (hardware and software).
' Bilingual communication skills (english, oral & written 80%).
' Customer Service skills.

INTERESTS

' Music.
' Foreign languages.
' Story.

RECOMMENDATIONS

' J
' Lic.
' Lic.

Edit/Delete Message

12056 views
updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by WilIbanez

13 Answers

0
votes

In that case most people say not gender, but gender identity, to avoid confusion.

Yes, that's true. And the confusion arises because people mix the words sex and gender. I used to think they were the same thing, until I read a discussion about these words some years ago on a translator's forum.

But on a resume or other such formal document, sex is definitely the preferred word, not gender.

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

In that case most people say not gender, but gender identity, to avoid confusion. (in my opinion)

James Santiago said:

Just to add to this, a person can be of one sex and the opposite gender. Where I live, San Francisco, this is not uncommon. In the second grade (7-year-olds) at my boys' school is a student whose sex is male but whose gender is feminine, as he dresses like a girl, plays with the girls, wears his hair like a girl, and says he wants to be a girl.

Interestingly, his mother is Colombian and his father is Honduran (but raised in the US), so they speak Spanish and English at home. The boy doesn't speak much Spanish, but when he does, he mixes up gender in reference to himself, saying, for example, estoy cansado or estoy cansada. But he doesn't mix it up in reference to others, so it isn't a language problem. He will probably settle on one or the other as he grows older.

>

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Hello, Wil. I just wanted to emphasize that in the U.S., CV is a term used almost exclusively in academia. The CV for a university professor could be rather lengthy and for example may list all his publications, positions in the university, conferences attended, etc.

In any other context in the U.S., as James pointed out, it would be a resume. (resume is supposed to have an accent, as he typed, but lots of people leave it off).

Free advice: find out what the norms are in the country(ies) where you'll be looking for a job. Even here in the U.S., what's expected on a high-quality resume has changed over the past few years.

Good luck!

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Just to add to this, a person can be of one sex and the opposite gender. Where I live, San Francisco, this is not uncommon. In the second grade (7-year-olds) at my boys' school is a student whose sex is male but whose gender is feminine, as he dresses like a girl, plays with the girls, wears his hair like a girl, and says he wants to be a girl.

Interestingly, his mother is Colombian and his father is Honduran (but raised in the US), so they speak Spanish and English at home. The boy doesn't speak much Spanish, but when he does, he mixes up gender in reference to himself, saying, for example, estoy cansado or estoy cansada. But he doesn't mix it up in reference to others, so it isn't a language problem. He will probably settle on one or the other as he grows older.

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Heidita said:

Oh, thanks , james, I thought it had to be gender.


Gender is/should be used in the context of grammatical discussions. If you go back a week or two to a topic in which James suggested that Spanish was "sexist", Lazarus was fairly insistent on the distinction. I, too, some weeks earlier, tried to make the same distinction, i.e. gender != sex (sorry about the use of the idiom from C, if i could, I would use an equal sign with a stroke through it to mean "not equal").

To be sure, there are official forms (written by the grammatically insensitive) that use "gender" where "sex" would be more accurate but one must assume that they are trying to avoid the use of "three-letter words".

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

Wil
San josé,
Cell:
email

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Date of Birth:
Citizenship:
ID number:
Sex:
Marital Status:

EMPLOYMENT HISTORY

EDUCATION

' High School:
' Instituto Jiménez:
' Academia Shakespeare:

SKILLS AND ABILITIES
Computing skills.
English communication skills. (oral and written, 80%).
Customer Service skills.

RECOMMENDATIONS

I took the sample from some site, thanks for your help, guys

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by WilIbanez
0
votes

Oh, thanks , james, I thought it had to be gender.

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

No, sex is the preferred word in this context.

Sex = male and female
Gender = masculine and feminine

Sex refers to biological differences; chromosomes, hormonal profiles, internal and external sex organs.

Gender describes the characteristics that a society or culture considers to be masculine or feminine. Also used for grammatical purposes.

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

I think it must be "gender". Not sex.

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

hmmm, Yes, but this CV is going to be used in Costa Rica. will the percentage be understood '

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

But I don't even know what ABC would mean. Those are only used for grades in school classes (or used to be used). And if Will is referring to a school grade, what does 80% mean? Is that good?

As far as I know, there is no standard way of quantifying language skills in the US, at least that would be understood by an average employer. I guess it depends on where Will is applying for a job. The resume should match the customs of that country.

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

' Bilingual communication skills (english, oral & written 80%).


*
It is a system much more logical than the A/B/C/... grading system used in English speaking countries: 0% is the worst, and 100% is perfect.*

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Id number:

Should be ID (in caps).

' Computing skills (hardware and software).

The employer will want to know more specifically what your skill level is.

' Bilingual communication skills (english, oral & written 80%).

English must be capitalized, and the percentage means nothing to me. What is it based on?

' Customer Service skills.

Service does not need to be capitalized here. And again, you need to be more specific about your skill set.

*INTERESTS

' Music.
' Foreign languages.
' Story.*

I was taught to include only material that was relevant to the job in question, so music may not be relevant. And what does story mean? Also, there should be no period after story.

' J
' Lic.
' Lic.

I don't understand these abbreviations.

There are many websites that give templates for résumés (as we call CVs in the US). You might want to look at some for ideas.

updated NOV 5, 2008
posted by 00bacfba