HomeQ&Acodo con codo

codo con codo

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Please, whta´s the meaning of these word.

4646 views
updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by Aina

15 Answers

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This is a ridiculous translation, which has already been pointed out...how can someone be side by side with himself'? This being Lorca (the guardia civil gave it away for me...) i would guess he's using codo con codo to say that the prisoners arms are tied behind his back. obviously that's too cumbersome for poetry, but "side by side" or "arm in arm" is just not cutting it..he's the guardia's prisoner, not his lover lol

updated FEB 11, 2009
posted by Luarela
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That is a very stilted machine translation. It strips all the poetry from the original, and isn't even grammatically correct in many places. The pertinent section here is:

And in the middle of the road,
under the branches of an elm,
Civil Guard road
brought him side by side.

{shudder}

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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CalvoViejo said:

James Santiago said:

Ah, now that we know that is is from Lorca (The Arrest of Antonio Camborio on the Road to Seville), we can help. I see that this sentence has been translated professionally as follows.And in the middle of the road, beneath the branches of elm, the Civil Guard goose step by, and bear him off, arm in arm.

James, you did it again! You absolutely amaze me with your knowledge. You recognized the quote and knew from where it came. I wish I had the same facility, but, alas, I'm a pauper next to you.

CV

Hi Calvo, here it is or at least a version of it.

Ignition ANTONIO EL CAMBORIO EN EL CAMINO THE CAMBORIO ON THE ROAD DE SEVILLA SEVILLE

Antonio Torres Heredia, Antonio Torres Heredia,
hijo y nieto de Camborios, son and grandson of Camborios,
con una vara de mimbre with a rod of wicker
va a Sevilla a ver los toros. Sevilla will see the bulls.

Moreno de verde luna Moreno green moon
anda despacio y garboso. Go slowly and graceful.
Sus empavonados bucles Their loops empavonados
le brillan entre los ojos. you between the eyes shine.
A la mitad del camino In the middle of the road
cortó limones redondos, cut lemons round
y los fue tirando al agua and was pulling water
hasta que la puso de oro. until it became the gold.
Y a la mitad del camino, And in the middle of the road,
bajo las ramas de un olmo, under the branches of an elm,
guardia civil caminera Civil Guard road
lo llevó codo con codo. brought him side by side.

'

El día se va despacio, The day is going slowly,
la tarde colgada a un hombro, Afternoon hung on one shoulder,
dando una larga torera giving a long bullfighter
sobre el mar y los arroyos. on the sea and streams.

Las aceitunas aguardan The olives are waiting
la noche de Capricornio, the night of Capricorn,
y una corta brisa, ecuestre, and a short breeze, equestrian,
salta los monte de plomo. skips the mountain of lead.
Antonio Torres Heredia, Antonio Torres Heredia,
hijo y nieto de Camborios, son and grandson of Camborios,
viene sin vara de mimbre comes with a rod of wicker
entre los cinco tricornios. among the five tricornios.

Antonio ¿Quién eres tú? Antonio Who are you?
Si te llamaras Camborio, If you call Camborio,
hubieras hecho una fuente have done a source
de sangre, con cinco chorros. Blood, with five jets.
Ni tú eres hijo de nadie, Or you are the son of anyone,
ni legítimo Camborio. Camborio nor legitimate.
¡Se acabaron los gitanos Gone are the gypsies
que iban por el monte solos! who were on the mountain alone!
Están los viejos cuchillos There are the old knives
tiritando bajo el polvo. shivering under the dust.

'

A las nueve de la noche At nine o'clock in the evening
lo llevan al calabozo, take him to the dungeon,
mientras los guardias civiles while the civil guards
beben limonada todos. drink lemonade all.
Y a las nueve de la noche And at nine o'clock at night
le cierran el calabozo, he closed the lock,
mientras el cielo reluce while the sky shines
como la grupa de un potro. as the hindquarters of a colt.

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by Eddy
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CV, you give me too much credit. All I did was guess from the style that it was literary, probably from a famous work, so I googled it and found the translation. Would that I could memorize passages of books!

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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James Santiago said:

Ah, now that we know that is is from Lorca (The Arrest of Antonio Camborio on the Road to Seville), we can help. I see that this sentence has been translated professionally as follows.And in the middle of the road, beneath the branches of elm, the Civil Guard goose step by, and bear him off, arm in arm.


James, you did it again! You absolutely amaze me with your knowledge. You recognized the quote and knew from where it came. I wish I had the same facility, but, alas, I'm a pauper next to you.
CV

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by CalvoViejo
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Ah, now that we know that is is from Lorca (The Arrest of Antonio Camborio on the Road to Seville), we can help. I see that this sentence has been translated professionally as follows.

And in the middle of the road, beneath the branches of elm, the Civil Guard goose step by, and bear him off, arm in arm.

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Natasha said:

Edna Castro Witarsa said:

Ok Calvo, the context is:thanks. "....A la mitad del camino, bajo las ramas de un olmo guardia civil caminera lo llevó codo con codo."

CalvoViejo said:

This is a guess:Arm in arm.With more context we could give a better translation.

caminera sounds odd to me here. Is anyone else understanding the latter half of the sentence?


guardia on "foot patrol"'

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by samdie
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Edna Castro Witarsa said:

Ok Calvo, the context is:thanks.

"....A la mitad del camino, bajo las ramas de un olmo guardia civil caminera lo llevó codo con codo."

CalvoViejo said:

This is a guess:Arm in arm.With more context we could give a better translation.

caminera sounds odd to me here. Is anyone else understanding the latter half of the sentence'

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by Natasha
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codo is elbow, that part in the middle of the arm.
In spanish we usually say "trabajar codo con codo" that means "work hard all together, making and effort". So "codo con codo" is all together.
there are other expressions with this word, "codo":
"hincar los codos" or "apretar los codos" or "romperse los codos": to study hard, study a lot. (it's like to say that you must put your elbows on the table to study"
"hablar por los codos": To talk a lot.
"codo a codo": to tie the arms or the elbows in your back (with prisoners)
"empinar el codo" or "levantar el codo": To drink too much.
And much more.

updated OCT 3, 2008
posted by lmhierro
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James as you ask:

"....A la mitad del camino, bajo las ramas de un olmo guardia civil caminera lo llevó codo con codo.

James Santiago said:

It is similar to "codo a codo," which both can mean something like side by side or neck and neck, depending on the context. The best English translation will vary with the context, so you have to give us something.

>

updated OCT 2, 2008
posted by Aina
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Ok Calvo, the context is:thanks.

"....A la mitad del camino, bajo las ramas de un olmo guardia civil caminera lo llevó codo con codo."

CalvoViejo said:

This is a guess:Arm in arm.With more context we could give a better translation.

>

updated OCT 2, 2008
posted by Aina
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google translate says its side by side if that helps. i know its not the most reliable but it sounds right

updated OCT 2, 2008
posted by Baloo
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It is similar to "codo a codo," which both can mean something like side by side or neck and neck, depending on the context. The best English translation will vary with the context, so you have to give us something.

updated OCT 2, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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This is a guess:

Arm in arm.

With more context we could give a better translation.

updated OCT 2, 2008
posted by CalvoViejo
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"Codo" might mean cheapskate but I would need more context to be sure. Technically, it means elbow.

updated OCT 2, 2008
posted by LadyDi
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