What does De donde es tu profesora mean? How do you translate it? HELP

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What does De donde es tu profesora mean? How do you translate it'

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updated OCT 13, 2010
posted by Matthew-Levine

16 Answers

1
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*Of course, if we all followed the rule we learned in high school English, we wouldn't leave dangling prepositions in English, either.

From where is your professor'*

Yes, but sounding like Yoda it is.

updated OCT 13, 2010
posted by 00bacfba
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profesora: teacher

Where is your teacher from'

updated OCT 13, 2010
posted by 00494d19
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It means "how is your spanish teacher" but it means look for what she looks like(color of hair, how tall or short she is, is she nice or not) it does not mean her feelings.

updated OCT 13, 2010
posted by AmberKelly
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James Santiago said:

*Of course, if we all followed the rule we learned in high school English, we wouldn't leave dangling prepositions in English, either.

From where is your professor'*

Yes, but sounding like Yoda it is.

Like you I do.

updated OCT 1, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Natasha said:

Of course, if we all followed the rule we learned in high school English, we wouldn't leave dangling prepositions in English, either.

From where is your professor?
There is a story (possibly apocryphal) to the effect that Winston Churchill (after being told that he had just made the mistake of ending a sentence with a preposition) said "That is an outrage up with which I shall not put!"

updated OCT 1, 2008
posted by samdie
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samdie said:

Okojo said:

Where is the teacher from? Or if it is "¿Donde es tu profesora de'" using "es" (ser) means more of long lasting question than "¿de donde esta tu profesora? which means where is her general proximity right now. ¿Claro?

It's clear but it's wrong! "¿Donde es tu profesora de'" is a word-for-word translation of the English and the result is a collection of Spanish words but not a Spanish sentence. "de dónde" functions as a unit (and means "from where". hence, "¿De dónde es tu profesora'" = "Where is your teacher from'"

"¿Dónde está tu profesora'" is how one asks "Where is your teacher (now)'" the verb "estar" is not used in constructions introduced by "de dónde".

Of course, if we all followed the rule we learned in high school English, we wouldn't leave dangling prepositions in English, either.

From where is your professor'

updated OCT 1, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
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Okojo said:

Where is the teacher from? Or if it is "¿Donde es tu profesora de'" using "es" (ser) means more of long lasting question than "¿de donde esta tu profesora? which means where is her general proximity right now.

¿Claro?


It's clear but it's wrong! "¿Donde es tu profesora de'" is a word-for-word translation of the English and the result is a collection of Spanish words but not a Spanish sentence. "de dónde" functions as a unit (and means "from where". hence, "¿De dónde es tu profesora'" = "Where is your teacher from'"

"¿Dónde está tu profesora'" is how one asks "Where is your teacher (now)'" the verb "estar" is not used in constructions introduced by "de dónde".

updated OCT 1, 2008
posted by samdie
0
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Where is the teacher from? Or if it is "¿Donde es tu profesora de'" using "es" (ser) means more of long lasting question than "¿de donde esta tu profesora? which means where is her general proximity right now.

¿Claro'

updated SEP 30, 2008
posted by Okojo
0
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samdie said:

lazarus1907 said:

samdie said:

Properly speaking (in the U.S.) a "professor" should have a PHD. Otherwise he's a (mere) teacher/instructor. Where does "catedrático" fit into the hierarchy for Spanish institutions of higher education?

Catedrático is someone who has a "cátedra" (cathedra = chair), which is the highest category or rank that you can reach in the public education, both in high school and universities, similar to a professorship. In universities it would be equivalent more or less to a professor with a PhD, and in high school something like the head of a department or someone important. In the past the "cátedra" was a high chair from which university teachers delivered their lessons.

Well, of course, the phrase "ex cathedra" (in the papal context) is familiar. In our universities a PHD is, more or less, required for tenure. and, thus, the "chair" is reserved as the title for the head of a department (which, technically, does not require that one have a PHD). It is, of course, highly unlikely that anyone would be chosen to be "chair" without having a PHD (unless no one in the department had one).

P.S. In U.S. universities "professor with a PHD" would usually be considered redundant. Although there are students who will address any instructor as "professor", most teachers (who do not have the PHD) would be inclined to tell such students to use "Mr/Miss/Mrs/Ms as a form of address.

There are some exceptions to the Ph.D. rule samdie is making (in smaller colleges -- I went to one). However, I acknowledge that in general you are correct.

updated SEP 30, 2008
posted by Natasha
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lazarus1907 said:

samdie said:

Properly speaking (in the U.S.) a "professor" should have a PHD. Otherwise he's a (mere) teacher/instructor. Where does "catedrático" fit into the hierarchy for Spanish institutions of higher education?

Catedrático is someone who has a "cátedra" (cathedra = chair), which is the highest category or rank that you can reach in the public education, both in high school and universities, similar to a professorship. In universities it would be equivalent more or less to a professor with a PhD, and in high school something like the head of a department or someone important. In the past the "cátedra" was a high chair from which university teachers delivered their lessons.


Well, of course, the phrase "ex cathedra" (in the papal context) is familiar. In our universities a PHD is, more or less, required for tenure. and, thus, the "chair" is reserved as the title for the head of a department (which, technically, does not require that one have a PHD). It is, of course, highly unlikely that anyone would be chosen to be "chair" without having a PHD (unless no one in the department had one).

P.S. In U.S. universities "professor with a PHD" would usually be considered redundant. Although there are students who will address any instructor as "professor", most teachers (who do not have the PHD) would be inclined to tell such students to use "Mr/Miss/Mrs/Ms as a form of address.

updated SEP 30, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

samdie said:

Properly speaking (in the U.S.) a "professor" should have a PHD. Otherwise he's a (mere) teacher/instructor. Where does "catedrático" fit into the hierarchy for Spanish institutions of higher education?

Catedrático is someone who has a "cátedra" (cathedra = chair), which is the highest category or rank that you can reach in the public education, both in high school and universities, similar to a professorship. In universities it would be equivalent more or less to a professor with a PhD, and in high school something like the head of a department or someone important. In the past the "cátedra" was a high chair from which university teachers delivered their lessons.

updated SEP 30, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
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lazarus1907 said:

profesora = (female) teacher

In Spanish (or at least, in Spain), any teacher is called "profesor", whether you refer to primary, secondary education, private teaching, or whatever. In English "professor" normally is someone important in a college or university.


Properly speaking (in the U.S.) a "professor" should have a PHD. Otherwise he's a (mere) teacher/instructor. Where does "catedrático" fit into the hierarchy for Spanish institutions of higher education'

updated SEP 30, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

profesora = (female) teacher

In Spanish (or at least, in Spain), any teacher is called "profesor", whether you refer to primary, secondary education, private teaching, or whatever. In English "professor" normally is someone important in a college or university.

updated SEP 30, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Hi Matthew
All your title needed to say was "De donde es tu profesora". The rest can be added to the description box.

updated SEP 30, 2008
posted by Eddy
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¿De dónde es tu profesora?

Where is your professor from'

updated SEP 30, 2008
posted by Natasha