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poco poco?

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what does "poco poco" mean'

13530 views
updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by jc

19 Answers

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little by little = poco a poco

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by pasabolita
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Can t ty pe ri ght n ow.......eating C R O W
poco a poco in Mexico at least in Sonora Mexico
oh f ea thers are stu ck hhhhhheeeellllpppppp

La Cosa said:

I am going to the woodshed next if I don't site a souce. Don't feel bad! LOL

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updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by La-Cosa
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Unless you're over 30, I think you're supposed to say "I'm soooo busted!"

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by samdie
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Oh I am busted!!!!! Hey, english is my second language......estoy bromeando! smile

James Santiago said:

I am going to the woodshed next if I don't site a souce.I'm taking you anyway, for writing site instead of cite. But I won't give extra whacks for "souce." hehe

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updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by La-Cosa
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I am going to the woodshed next if I don't site a souce.

I'm taking you anyway, for writing site instead of cite. But I won't give extra whacks for "souce." hehe

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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ok, thank you

La Cosa said:

I am going to the woodshed next if I don't site a souce. Don't feel bad! LOL

>

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by 00769608
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Gus said:

There was no question -as far as I know - James Santiago took me to the woodshed because, I am not putting all my atention to the discussion on this forum.

Lo siento, no quiso confundirle a nadie.

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by Natasha
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I am going to the woodshed next if I don't site a souce. Don't feel bad! LOL

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by La-Cosa
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There was no question -as far as I know - James Santiago took me to the woodshed because, I am not putting all my atention to the discussion on this forum.

Natasha said:

Gus said:

I was confused by Nathasa first answer. She wrote poco a poco

James Santiago said:

Gus said:

Yes indeed poco a poco is used often in Guatémala ans La republica del Salvador. I am not sure about Mexico but it (the frase poco a poco ) might be use there.

Gus, please note that we weren't talking about poco a poco (a standard phrase everywhere in the Spanish-speaking world, as far as I know), but poco poco. Natasha suggested that this might be an error for poco a poco in the very first post, but my subsequent comments were about La Cosa's translation of poco poco.

Yo no entendí qué es la pregunta aquí . . .

>

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by 00769608
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Gus said:

I was confused by Nathasa first answer. She wrote poco a poco

James Santiago said:

Gus said:

Yes indeed poco a poco is used often in Guatémala ans La republica del Salvador. I am not sure about Mexico but it (the frase poco a poco ) might be use there.

Gus, please note that we weren't talking about poco a poco (a standard phrase everywhere in the Spanish-speaking world, as far as I know), but poco poco. Natasha suggested that this might be an error for poco a poco in the very first post, but my subsequent comments were about La Cosa's translation of poco poco.

Yo no entendí qué es la pregunta aquí . . .

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by Natasha
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I was confused by Nathasa first answer. She wrote poco a poco

James Santiago said:

Gus said:

Yes indeed poco a poco is used often in Guatémala ans La republica del Salvador. I am not sure about Mexico but it (the frase poco a poco ) might be use there.

Gus, please note that we weren't talking about poco a poco (a standard phrase everywhere in the Spanish-speaking world, as far as I know), but poco poco. Natasha suggested that this might be an error for poco a poco in the very first post, but my subsequent comments were about La Cosa's translation of poco poco.

>

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by 00769608
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Gus said:

Yes indeed poco a poco is used often in Guatémala ans La republica del Salvador. I am not sure about Mexico but it (the frase poco a poco ) might be use there.

Gus, please note that we weren't talking about poco a poco (a standard phrase everywhere in the Spanish-speaking world, as far as I know), but poco poco. Natasha suggested that this might be an error for poco a poco in the very first post, but my subsequent comments were about La Cosa's translation of poco poco.

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Yes indeed poco a poco is used often in Guatémala ans La republica del Salvador. I am not sure about Mexico but it (the frase poco a poco ) might be use there.

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by 00769608
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We are going to be friends! I translated it by using the translator on this website.

I've heard it somewhere....maybe it's central america spanish..... Maybe the only phrase I remember from Panama. Not sure....I will ask around. Don't mean to provide false information.

James Santiago said:

La Cosa said:

Do you feel better.....poco poco (Little bit)

La Cosa, where did you get that? Remember that un poco means "a little bit," but poco by itself means "not much." So if someone answered poco poco, I would think it meant "not much, not much."Me siento un poco mejor = I feel a little betterMe siento poco mejor (sounds odd) = I feel little better (that is, not much better)Incidentally, one of my favorite songs is La Bamba, and I was crushed to learn years back that its lyrics mock the way gringos speak Spanish. There is a line that says "Para bailar la bamba, se necesicita una poca de gracia." Foreigners probably try to make all the nouns agree in gender, matching poca to gracia, but "un poco" is invariable.

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updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by La-Cosa
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Aside: there's a bar / restaurant here in Jefferson City called "La Bamba." My husband asked me about the name, but I didn't know where it came from . . .

Viene de Veracruz, México, donde nació La Bamba. Los cantantes en restaurantes veracruzanos, por ejemplo, cambian las letras de la canción en el acto, a fin de que las letras se refieran a los clientes. Muy gracioso, a veces.

Hear the song here:

<http://www.youtube.com/watch'v=YicJPLT1dWU>

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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