HomeQ&AHow would you say "We got to work"

How would you say "We got to work"

0
votes

Hi,
How would you say "(after that)..we got to work".

1335 views
updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Michael-Robinson

12 Answers

0
votes

James Santiago said:

Eddy said:

Funnily enough, in the East End of London, samdie's translation is correct. We got to work colloquially means "we must work or we have to work".

It's used that way in the US, too, but it is considered uneducated speech.

However, I think everyone has missed the intended meaning here, which is neither "we have to work" nor "we arrived at work," but rather "we set to work." The latter would be "Nos pusimos a trabajar."

Thanks everyone,

Sorry about the lack of context. That was my first post ever (on any forum). I'll try to be clearer next time.

Indeed, I was asking about "we set to work".

thanks again

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Michael-Robinson
0
votes

James Santiago said:

Gracias. ¿Serías tan amable de traducir los siguientes ejemplos? Mom said we get to go to the movies tomorrow!

If he comes home by then, we'll all get to spend Christmas together.

At first his father wouldn't allow it, but in the end he got to buy the car.

I can't think of a better (natural) way other than using "poder" for these sentences:

Mamá dijo que podremos ir al cine mañana.
Si viene a casa para entonces, podremos pasar las Navidades juntos / disfrutaremos las Navidades juntos.
Al principio su padre no se lo permitía, pero al final se pudo comprar el coche.

Let me think about it.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

It is hard, and I think you need to rephrase it depending on the sentence. It could be something like "tener la oportunidad de hacer algo", "ponerse por fin a hacer algo", etc.

Gracias. ¿Serías tan amable de traducir los siguientes ejemplos?

Mom said we get to go to the movies tomorrow!

If he comes home by then, we'll all get to spend Christmas together.

At first his father wouldn't allow it, but in the end he got to buy the car.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

After getting certified, we got to work on the technical side frequently. Indeed! I hadn't thought of that one. And this is a construction I have always struggled with, both in Japanese (in which there is no good way to express it) and in Spanish (in which I have yet to find a way).

For non-native English speakers, "get to do something" means that you are able to do something pleasurable. It is that last word that is the catch. Of course, we could translate Natasha's example as "...pudimos trabajar...," but that doesn't tell the reader that we were looking forward to the work, that it was desirable to us.

It is hard, and I think you need to rephrase it depending on the sentence. It could be something like "tener la oportunidad de hacer algo", "ponerse por fin a hacer algo", etc.

At least I can't think of anything better. I am not a translator after all.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

After getting certified, we got to work on the technical side frequently.

Indeed! I hadn't thought of that one. And this is a construction I have always struggled with, both in Japanese (in which there is no good way to express it) and in Spanish (in which I have yet to find a way).

For non-native English speakers, "get to do something" means that you are able to do something pleasurable. It is that last word that is the catch. Of course, we could translate Natasha's example as "...pudimos trabajar...," but that doesn't tell the reader that we were looking forward to the work, that it was desirable to us.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

However, I think everyone has missed the intended meaning here, which is neither "we have to work" nor "we arrived at work," but rather "we set to work." The latter would be "Nos pusimos a trabajar."

We have at least four possible interpretations here, all valid.

After resting in the shade and drinking some water, we all got back to work.
After the police cleared the accident, we got to work just fine.
After this we got to work or the teacher gonna get us good. (non-standard)
After getting certified, we got to work on the technical side frequently.

I am getting tired of all these discussions without context . . .

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Eddy said:

Funnily enough, in the East End of London, samdie's translation is correct. We got to work colloquially means "we must work or we have to work".

It's used that way in the US, too, but it is considered uneducated speech.

However, I think everyone has missed the intended meaning here, which is neither "we have to work" nor "we arrived at work," but rather "we set to work." The latter would be "Nos pusimos a trabajar."

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Funnily enough, in the East End of London, samdie's translation is correct. We got to work colloquially means "we must work or we have to work".

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

We gotta get more context!

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Natasha said:

je je -- we need more context!! I thought he was saying llegamos al trabajo!

Hehe, true. We got to work = We arrive to work.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

samdie said:

Tenemos que trabajar.

je je -- we need more context!! I thought he was saying llegamos al trabajo!

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Tenemos que trabajar.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by samdie
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.