HomeQ&Aopen communication

open communication

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This phrase came up in another thread. Here is the original context:

Open Door Policy:
Conferences do not need to be reserved for IEP meetings or student conference week (in November). We both want your child to succeed. Open communication is the first step toward that goal.

I really would like to know a good way to express the same idea in Spanish. There is a related saying in English: "keeping the lines of communication open." That saying is on wordreference, but it still doesn't quite convey the idea of "open communication."

2844 views
updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by Natasha

10 Answers

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"
keeping the lines of communication open." es necesario tener libres las lineas de comunicasion

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by 00769608
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James Santiago said:

Another thing, regarding Natasha's statement: "Me temo que no tiene traducción," I think it is correct. It is the same as, "I'm afraid there is no translation," which wouldn't warrant the subjunctive. It's kind of like when you're letting someone down easily, you might say, "I'm afraid not." I could be wrong though. Maybe another fluent speaker can clear that up.

Actually, temer and temerse can be used with both indicative and subjunctive, depending on the intended meaning. With the subjunctive, they indicate fear, and with the indicative, they indicate suspicion. I may have misinterpreted Natasha's intent, but the way I wrote it, she is worried that she won't find a translation. If she just wanted to say "I suspect that..." (= sospecho que), then the indicative would be fine.

I meant to use the subjunctive & indicate doubt.

Me temo que no tenga traducción. Tengo miedo que no haya ningua traducción. etc.

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Another thing, regarding Natasha's statement: "Me temo que no tiene traducción," I think it is correct. It is the same as, "I'm afraid there is no translation," which wouldn't warrant the subjunctive. It's kind of like when you're letting someone down easily, you might say, "I'm afraid not." I could be wrong though. Maybe another fluent speaker can clear that up.

Actually, temer and temerse can be used with both indicative and subjunctive, depending on the intended meaning. With the subjunctive, they indicate fear, and with the indicative, they indicate suspicion. I may have misinterpreted Natasha's intent, but the way I wrote it, she is worried that she won't find a translation. If she just wanted to say "I suspect that..." (= sospecho que), then the indicative would be fine.

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Maybe I should've written, "Política de Entrada Libre," though I don't think it would satisfy Natasha's point about both parties listening to each other. Another thing, regarding Natasha's statement: "Me temo que no tiene traducción," I think it is correct. It is the same as, "I'm afraid there is no translation," which wouldn't warrant the subjunctive. It's kind of like when you're letting someone down easily, you might say, "I'm afraid not." I could be wrong though. Maybe another fluent speaker can clear that up.

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by LadyDi
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Natasha said:

Well, it doesn't just mean that they can communicate at any time, or that they can communicate well or easily. It also implies that they are not afraid to share their observations or opinions, and that the other party will really listen.

I suppose you could read that into the text, but it isn't clear to me. Without further context, it looks to me like the text is just saying that teachers will always be available for discussion. After all, the heading is "Open Door Policy," and that is what that means.

Anyway, we should wait for a NSS to chime in.

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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James Santiago said:

"Temo que no tenga traducción."

Gracias, es que nunca voy a dominar ese subjuntivo maldito. Ya sabía que se necesita en esa frase, pero se me olvidó.

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Well, it doesn't just mean that they can communicate at any time, or that they can communicate well or easily. It also implies that they are not afraid to share their observations or opinions, and that the other party will really listen.

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Natasha said:

Me temo que no tiene traducción.

"Temo que no tenga traducción."

I'm sure this concept can be translated, since it isn't anything specific to English. A fluent speaker (I'm not one) just has to understand exactly what concepts are being expressed in this situation, and then express that situation in natural Spanish.

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Me temo que no tiene traducción.

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by Natasha
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The key in the above context is that parents don't need an appointment to talk to teachers (or whomever), but can taIk to them whenever desired. I wonder if we could say "(Poder) comunicarnos bien es el primer paso hacia esa meta."

Maybe not.

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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