Questions about trip vocabulary

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I want to say that I am on a a trip back home in spanish, is "viaje vuelvo al inicio" ok, or is something else better'

4853 views
updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Jennifer

20 Answers

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I think there's a simple answer to this:

Sarasi, you have been given the answer to your query, or so it appears.

So I don't think the argument needs to continue, really...with all due respect...

Simply put - there is an 'etiquette' to writing online. As people are only reading your text and not seeing your expression, hearing your voice & intonation, etc., I think it's simpler and easier (judging from the length of this thread) to just be polite.

At the end of the day, the question was vague and could have been clarified without the comment 'why didn't you ask me'?

The people posting on this site are incredibly friendly, and this is one of the first times I've seen anybody upset any of the regular posters here, so let's draw a line under it then, and move on...amicably?

:o)

(runs away before anybody decides to tell her off)

James Santiago said:

James, if the meaning was unclear, perhaps you should have tried what I did above.

If you were monitoring the thread, and saw people questioning what you meant, you should have posted a clarification right away. If you were not monitoring the thread, then my question to you would have gone unanswered at any rate.

just because you are a professional translator does not mean that you can take on such a haughty tone either.

My tone was indignant. That, because when I had spent considerable time (which literally equals money to me) trying to help you, your only comment was worded as "Instead of speculating on my meaning, why not just ask me'," which is hardly conducive to warm, fuzzy feelings. You should have been apologetic for not having provided enough information, rather than dismissive.

>

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Elle
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I did not monitor the thread on a minute by minute basis, I am in college, and had a class. The moment I knew people were questioning what I meant, (which took a while because I am only intermediate and did not know what many of you were saying) I did post a clarification. As for my tone, (which yes, I should have addressed in my previous post) it was not haughty, but rather apologetic and confused.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Jennifer
0
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James, if the meaning was unclear, perhaps you should have tried what I did above.

If you were monitoring the thread, and saw people questioning what you meant, you should have posted a clarification right away. If you were not monitoring the thread, then my question to you would have gone unanswered at any rate.

just because you are a professional translator does not mean that you can take on such a haughty tone either.

My tone was indignant. That, because when I had spent considerable time (which literally equals money to me) trying to help you, your only comment was worded as "Instead of speculating on my meaning, why not just ask me'," which is hardly conducive to warm, fuzzy feelings. You should have been apologetic for not having provided enough information, rather than dismissive.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Sorry, Lazarus, the meaning of your statement is unclear, can you please elaborate? The part that gives me trouble is "and you shouldn't listen to James, if you want useful help from competent people." then you say, "as a teacher, I always learn from him, so I suggest you try to do the same." Which do you want me to do? Listen, or not listen to him?

James, if the meaning was unclear, perhaps you should have tried what I did above. Spanish is a confusing language, and just because you are a professional translator does not mean that you can take on such a haughty tone either. Lazarus (as a teacher) probably knows that acting like you are better than everyone else, because you know more, is not a good way to help people learn.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Jennifer
0
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Sarasi Dunel (Jenny) said:

Excuse me, I thought the information was unneeded. I am a native English speaker and we don't need to include that.

Well, you're then unaware of other people's point of view, and you shouldn't listen to James, if you want useful help from competent people. He is a professional translator, and as a teacher, I always learn from him, so I suggest you try to do the same.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Excuse me, I thought the information was unneeded. I am a native English speaker and we don't need to include that.

I'm a native speaker, too, but your meaning wasn't at all clear to me. In fact, it is my opinion that what you wrote cannot mean what you say you intended it to mean, and that nobody would ever write those words in such a situation. Therefore, you did need to include context, to make clear your meaning.

When you ask people for help, but don't give them enough context to help, and as a result they don't understand your question, you really shouldn't take a haughty tone.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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Excuse me, I thought the information was unneeded. I am a native English speaker and we don't need to include that.

James Santiago said:

Instead of speculating on my meaning, why not just ask me'

Instead of making us ask, why not just tell us the context from the start'! You've got a bunch of people trying to help you, but wasting their time because you didn't provide enough information.

>

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Jennifer
0
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Instead of speculating on my meaning, why not just ask me'

Instead of making us ask, why not just tell us the context from the start'! You've got a bunch of people trying to help you, but wasting their time because you didn't provide enough information.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

voy de regreso a mi casa ,despues de mi viaje watch out for my lack of accents, or placed inproperly

Sarasi Dunel (Jenny) said:

Instead of speculating on my meaning, why not just ask me? I am on my way back home after a trip.

James Santiago said:

Gus wrote:voy de regreso a casita despues de mi viajeBut the English doesn't say "after my trip." If you lived abroad for 20 years and were traveling back home, either for a visit or to stay, and were writing a postcard to a friend along the way, you would say "I'm on a trip back home." But this isn't really "after my trip."The reason I say this is that, if someone merely traveled to a place for a vacation and were on the way back home, I don't think they would say "I am on a trip back home." They would just say "I am on my way back home" or something similar. Of course, as usual, we have no context from the original poster, so who knows?

>

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
votes

Instead of speculating on my meaning, why not just ask me? I am on my way back home after a trip.

James Santiago said:

Gus wrote: voy de regreso a casita despues de mi viaje

But the English doesn't say "after my trip." If you lived abroad for 20 years and were traveling back home, either for a visit or to stay, and were writing a postcard to a friend along the way, you would say "I'm on a trip back home." But this isn't really "after my trip."

The reason I say this is that, if someone merely traveled to a place for a vacation and were on the way back home, I don't think they would say "I am on a trip back home." They would just say "I am on my way back home" or something similar. Of course, as usual, we have no context from the original poster, so who knows?

>

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Jennifer
0
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I want to say that I am on a a trip back home

Would you then say ? voy de regreso a mi hogar?
o, estoy viajando a mi hogar?

James Santiago said:

Gus wrote:voy de regreso a casita despues de mi viajeBut the English doesn't say "after my trip." If you lived abroad for 20 years and were traveling back home, either for a visit or to stay, and were writing a postcard to a friend along the way, you would say "I'm on a trip back home." But this isn't really "after my trip."The reason I say this is that, if someone merely traveled to a place for a vacation and were on the way back home, I don't think they would say "I am on a trip back home." They would just say "I am on my way back home" or something similar. Of course, as usual, we have no context from the original poster, so who knows?

>

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
votes

Gus wrote:
voy de regreso a casita despues de mi viaje

But the English doesn't say "after my trip." If you lived abroad for 20 years and were traveling back home, either for a visit or to stay, and were writing a postcard to a friend along the way, you would say "I'm on a trip back home." But this isn't really "after my trip."

The reason I say this is that, if someone merely traveled to a place for a vacation and were on the way back home, I don't think they would say "I am on a trip back home." They would just say "I am on my way back home" or something similar. Of course, as usual, we have no context from the original poster, so who knows'

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

Lazarus, I think the intended meaning of the English is different. Jenny said she wants to say "I am on a trip back home," which means "I am on a journey in which I will return home." Let's say she has been living far away from home, and she is now on her way back.

That's a sharp comment. I didn't even considered that possibility of interpretation (shame on me)!

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

voy de regreso a casita despues de mi viaje

James Santiago said:

Lazarus wrote:You could say: "Vuelvo a casa después del viaje" (I'm going home after the trip), "Estoy de viaje y vuelvo a casa" (I'm on a trip and I'm going back home") or other alternatives.Lazarus, I think the intended meaning of the English is different. Jenny said she wants to say "I am on a trip back home," which means "I am on a journey in which I will return home." Let's say she has been living far away from home, and she is now on her way back.Could we say something like "Estoy de viaje volviendo a casa (o, a mi tierra/pueblo/etc.)"?

>

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
votes

Lazarus wrote:
You could say: "Vuelvo a casa después del viaje" (I'm going home after the trip), "Estoy de viaje y vuelvo a casa" (I'm on a trip and I'm going back home") or other alternatives.

Lazarus, I think the intended meaning of the English is different. Jenny said she wants to say "I am on a trip back home," which means "I am on a journey in which I will return home." Let's say she has been living far away from home, and she is now on her way back.

Could we say something like "Estoy de viaje volviendo a casa (o, a mi tierra/pueblo/etc.)"'

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00bacfba