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argazos

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Can someone translate the word "argazos" for me? It's some kind of sea weed, but which'

1681 views
updated ABR 8, 2011
posted by John-Fowler

11 Answers

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John Fowler said:

Excellent, Eddy, you have saved me some searching. Thanks to you and to everyone else.

No hay de que

updated SEP 26, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Excellent, Eddy, you have saved me some searching. Thanks to you and to everyone else.

updated SEP 26, 2008
posted by John-Fowler
0
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John Fowler said:

Wrong side of the country, James Santiago. The context is a legal document drawn up by a notary in Galicia, but I admit that the connection between argazos and sargazo sounds likely. I have finally taken it to mean "wrack", as in seaweed to be collected on the shore as opposed to algas or seaweed still living in the sea.

While on the subject of Spanish/Galician legal phraseology, do you have any suggestions for the following: "Sin Base de Cuantía"? This comes in the wrapping-up phase of a document, along with a list of other phrases confirming that everything has been done by the book and according to the requirements of particular laws. For some reason this particular phrase, which doesn't seem to make much sense when translated literally, is printed in capitals.

John
I found this reference on the internet.

Spanish term or phrase: sin base de cuantía
English translation: without a basis for valuation, no contract value, no assigned value

updated SEP 26, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
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Wrong side of the country, James Santiago. The context is a legal document drawn up by a notary in Galicia, but I admit that the connection between argazos and sargazo sounds likely. I have finally taken it to mean "wrack", as in seaweed to be collected on the shore as opposed to algas or seaweed still living in the sea.

While on the subject of Spanish/Galician legal phraseology, do you have any suggestions for the following: "Sin Base de Cuantía"? This comes in the wrapping-up phase of a document, along with a list of other phrases confirming that everything has been done by the book and according to the requirements of particular laws. For some reason this particular phrase, which doesn't seem to make much sense when translated literally, is printed in capitals.

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by John-Fowler
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John, most of the web sites that include this word are written in Catalan, and my guess is that argazo is Catalan for the Castellano sargazo, which is what AiFoS originally suggested. Does your context have anything to do with Catalonia'

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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Hi James Santiago.Thanks. I think you have nailed it, but is there a single name for washed up, detached seaweed? Wrack, perhaps? In the document I am translating it appears with "algas" as in "algas y argazos"

Actually have just checked with Collins which defines "wrack" as, amongst other things, "seaweed or other marine vegetation that is floating in the sea or has been cast ashore"

Apologies for the multiple repititions of my earlier answer, but I am new to this system!

James Santiago said:

From the Net:Gathering of seaweeds washed to the shore. In some countries these seaweeds [are] called "argazos," "arribazon," or "beach wash." These are dead seaweeds that, after completing their biological cycle, are separated by seasonal storms.John, note that seaweed is spelled as one word.

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updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by John-Fowler
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John Fowler said:

Eddy said:

John Fowler said:

Thanks, but I don't think it is as the word argazos appears several times in a legal document I am translating and also elsewhere. In one place it was described as the beastie that eats coral reefs, but I don't know what that is called in English

Hi JohnTry clicking on the link below.[url=http://translate.google.co.uk/translate'hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.nasdap.ejgv.euskadi.net/r50-3812/es/contenidos/informacion/licencias/es_8317/profesionales_algas_argazos.html&sa=X&oi=translate&resnum=6&ct=result&prev=/search%3Fq%3D%2522argazos%2522%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-GB:official%26hs%3D7Sr]Seaweed[/url]

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updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by John-Fowler
0
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Eddy said:

John Fowler said:

Thanks, but I don't think it is as the word argazos appears several times in a legal document I am translating and also elsewhere. In one place it was described as the beastie that eats coral reefs, but I don't know what that is called in English

Hi JohnTry clicking on the link below.[url=http://translate.google.co.uk/translate'hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.nasdap.ejgv.euskadi.net/r50-3812/es/contenidos/informacion/licencias/es_8317/profesionales_algas_argazos.html&sa=X&oi=translate&resnum=6&ct=result&prev=/search%3Fq%3D%2522argazos%2522%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-GB:official%26hs%3D7Sr]Seaweed[/url]

>

updated SEP 25, 2008
posted by John-Fowler
0
votes

From the Net:

Gathering of seaweeds washed to the shore. In some countries these seaweeds [are] called "argazos," "arribazon," or "beach wash." These are dead seaweeds that, after completing their biological cycle, are separated by seasonal storms.

John, note that seaweed is spelled as one word.

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

John Fowler said:

Thanks, but I don't think it is as the word argazos appears several times in a legal document I am translating and also elsewhere. In one place it was described as the beastie that eats coral reefs, but I don't know what that is called in English

Hi John
Try clicking on the link below.

[url=http://translate.google.co.uk/translate'hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.nasdap.ejgv.euskadi.net/r50-3812/es/contenidos/informacion/licencias/es_8317/profesionales_algas_argazos.html&sa=X&oi=translate&resnum=6&ct=result&prev=/search%3Fq%3D%2522argazos%2522%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-GB:official%26hs%3D7Sr]Seaweed[/url]

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Thanks, but I don't think it is as the word argazos appears several times in a legal document I am translating and also elsewhere. In one place it was described as the beastie that eats coral reefs, but I don't know what that is called in English

updated SEP 24, 2008
posted by John-Fowler
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