HomeQ&Ael título de una película

el título de una película

0
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En mi tarea para la semana, tengo que llenar los blancos con una palabra del cuento.

Esta es la frase, el título de una película

"Lo que el ___|\___| se llevó"

What the ___|\___| took, carried.

If no one knows from what I have written I can type out the story. I don't keep up with movies.

8052 views
updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by motley

21 Answers

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motley said:

Tad, Too funny, I see an academy award in your future.

tad said:

By the way you can see the definitive version of this film here

What happened is that there was an administrative error at the academy and my oscar nomination was mistakenly sent to Javier Bardem.

Probably.

updated SEP 23, 2008
posted by tad
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Tad, Too funny, I see an academy award in your future.

tad said:

By the way you can see the definitive version of this film here

>

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by motley
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I followed the link to the details Fitzgerald O'Hara''? Red Butler''? oops

Eddy said:

tad said:

Why does 'ido con el viento' sound horrible? -that would have been my guess. I wouldn't have thought of "Lo que el viento se llevó". in a million years. :-(

Hi Tad

Try googling as James has suggested above and it gives you the the film title in Spanish along with a small write up about the film. See below.

[url=http://translate.google.co.uk/translate'hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.zonadvd.com/modules.php%3Fname%3DNews%26file%3Darticle%26sid%3D1059&sa=X&oi=translate&resnum=1&ct=result&prev=/search%3Fq%3D%2522lo%2Bque%2Bel%2B'%2Bse%2Bllevo%2522%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-GB:official%26hs%3DyZZ]gone with the wind[/url]

You will have to click on details of the edition when you reach the link page.

>

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by motley
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By the way you can see the definitive version of this film here

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by tad
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James Santiago said:

tad said:


I don't know but the order is definitely reversed for the Spanish film.

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by tad
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tad said:

>

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Eddy wrote:
You gave me a similar tip last week about quotation marks. Is this something you just discovered or is there a google help line anywhere which outlines thye best way to search.

I've been googling since around 2000, so I've picked up quite a few tricks along the way. I don't know of a site that compiles them all, but I'd be flabbergasted if there aren't several. Google it and see!

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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James Santiago said:

as The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, and for Spanish-speaking countries, as El Bueno, el feo y el malo. A lot of money rides on these choices, and producers pay a lot for a "translation" of a title.

That's another thing I've never understood 'good bad ugly' vs 'bueno feo malo' 'El bueno, el malo y el feo' sounds fine to me

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by tad
0
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tad said:

Why does 'ido con el viento' sound horrible? -that would have been my guess. I wouldn't have thought of "Lo que el viento se llevó". in a million years. :-(

Hi Tad
Try googling as James has suggested above and it gives you the the film title in Spanish along with a small write up about the film. See below.

[url=http://translate.google.co.uk/translate'hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.zonadvd.com/modules.php%3Fname%3DNews%26file%3Darticle%26sid%3D1059&sa=X&oi=translate&resnum=1&ct=result&prev=/search%3Fq%3D%2522lo%2Bque%2Bel%2B'%2Bse%2Bllevo%2522%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-GB:official%26hs%3DyZZ]gone with the wind[/url]

You will have to click on details of the edition when you reach the link page.

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by Eddy
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motley said:

"Jaws" became "Tiburón" which I think sounds better than mandíbulas


Had it been "Mandibles", I think I would have rushed to see it in a movie theater (instead of waiting until it showed up on TV). Nonetheless, I can't help picturing a bunch of Hollywood producers saying "Four syllables? Americans can't handle that many!. We need a one syllable title!"

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by samdie
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James Santiago said:

Motley, I knew this one (viento/wind), but let me teach you a wonderful Google trick. Search for the following string, exactly as it appears.

"Lo que el ' se llevó"

You will quickly find your answer. If you need to narrow further, you can add words to your string (such as pelicula; accents aren't necessary in googling).

Hi James
You gave me a similar tip last week about quotation marks. Is this something you just discovered or is there a google help line anywhere which outlines thye best way to search.

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by Eddy
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motley said:

"Jaws" became "Tiburón" which I think sounds better than mandíbulas

I remember seeing a huge billboard in Paris for "Les Dents de la Mer."

Movie titles are often not literal translations of the original. What is important is that the title help sell the movie, by making people want to see it. The same applies to book titles.

Examples off the top of my head include two Clint Eastwood movies, both of which originally had Italian titles. The first is Giù la Testa, which is literally "Duck Your Head!," but was rendered as "A Fistful of Dynamite" for American audiences, the producers wisely deciding that the literal translation wasn't suitable. The Spanish title was ¡Agáchate, maldito!, which is closer to the Italian, but still distinct. The second example, on the other hand, is "Il Buono, il Brutto, il Cattivo," whose literal translation was deemed suitable for the US, as The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, and for Spanish-speaking countries, as El Bueno, el feo y el malo.

A lot of money rides on these choices, and producers pay a lot for a "translation" of a title.

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Why does 'ido con el viento' sound horrible? -that would have been my guess. I wouldn't have thought of "Lo que el viento se llevó". in a million years. :-(

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by tad
0
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"Jaws" became "Tiburón" which I think sounds better than mandíbulas

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by motley
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tad said:

"Lo que el viento se llevó". 'That which the wind carried off' (')

I'd be interested if any Spanish speakers have an alternative translation.


I would imagine that, under the circumstances, nobody is trying to provide a translation but, rather, the title under which it was released in Spanish speaking countries. much as "Amor sin Barerras" could hardly be considered a translation of "West Side Story".

updated SEP 22, 2008
posted by samdie
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