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pero o sino

1
vote

are there some rules as to when to use these conjunctions ? Is sino used just when comparing two things ? (not "A" sino "B") '

11194 views
updated FEB 6, 2010
posted by James-Schneider

5 Answers

2
votes

"not A but B" It may help you to think of "sino" as meaning "but rather" instead of simply "but".(which is normally "pero"). To the best of my knowledge it is always/only used in constructions that negate one (or more) choices and selects an alternative. Another possible term for the construction might be "for contrasting alternatives".

As is often the case, you can find several examples in the dictionary. Try double-clicking on "sino".

updated MAR 5, 2011
posted by samdie
2
votes

"not A but B" It may help you to think of "sino" as meaning "but rather" instead of simply "but".(which is normally "pero"). To the best of my knowledge it is always/only used in constructions that negate one (or more) choices and selects an alternative.

It is also used to mean except. "Nadie lo sabía sino Paco."

And when followed by que, it means only. "No quiero sino que me oigas" = I only want you to listen to me/I want only that you listen to me/I want only for you to listen to me/I want nothing but that you listen to me.

You can see that all of these meanings are related.

updated MAR 5, 2011
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Regan said:

Your first statement must be negative, and the following statement must be positive eg "no tengo hambre, sino mi hermano tiene mucho hambre" - the "no" at the start made the statement negative i.e. i wasn't hungry. then the following statement was postive because my brother was very hungry. I hope this makes sense to you haha.

keeping in this post can someone tell me the difference between "pero" and "mas" when they both mean "but"?


But take a look at the example in the dictionary. ¿quién sino tú lo haría? -> who else but you would do it?
There is no explicit negative. However there is an implied negative since this is (conceptually) equivalent to the assertion "nadie sino tú lo haría". In your "no tengo hambre..." sentence, "pero" sounds better to me (I think because of the change in subject in the second clause). Perhaps, Lazarus will weigh in on this topic.

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

Your first statement must be negative, and the following statement must be positive eg "no tengo hambre, sino mi hermano tiene mucho hambre" - the "no" at the start made the statement negative i.e. i wasn't hungry. then the following statement was postive because my brother was very hungry. I hope this makes sense to you haha.

keeping in this post can someone tell me the difference between "pero" and "mas" when they both mean "but"'

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by Regan
0
votes

thanks.... I was thinking that was the way it was to be used but wanted to throw the question out there.... thanks again.

samdie said:

"not A but B" It may help you to think of "sino" as meaning "but rather" instead of simply "but".(which is normally "pero"). To the best of my knowledge it is always/only used in constructions that negate one (or more) choices and selects an alternative. Another possible term for the construction might be "for contrasting alternatives".

As is often the case, you can find several examples in the dictionary. Try double-clicking on "sino".

>

updated SEP 20, 2008
posted by James-Schneider
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