spanish

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spanish

3902 views
updated SEP 20, 2008
posted by kamran2

20 Answers

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I think there are 4 ways of saying it.

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by motley
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I thought it was Tigrigna.

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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motley said:

Tigrina Language of Eritrea

I knew that would come in handy some day


It's no longer called Eritrean'! (As I recollect, that's what it was called when part of Ethiopia.)

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by samdie
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Tigrina
Language of Eritrea

I knew that would come in handy some day

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by motley
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:

There is no such language as "Indonesian",it is actually called Bahasa and is the same as Malay.

"Indonesian" is how most English speakers know the language; however, from what I know, "bahasa" is not the name of the language, but it actually means "language" in Malaysia and Indonesia, and many other Eastern countries. They call it "Bahasa Indonesia", which means "Language (of) Indonesia", in the same way that "Bahasa Malaysia" is the language of Malaysia, and Nepal Bahasa is the language from Nepal. We call them Malay and Nepalese/Nepali respectively.

The word bahasa is from Sanskrit origin, and therefore it is likely related to other Indo-European languages. In English, "bellow", "poltergeist" and "bell" are supposed to have the same origins.

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Selamat malam,apa khabar!(good evening,how are you!)
There is no such language as "Indonesian",it is actually called Bahasa and is the same as Malay.
Just out of interest "Orang Utan" actually means "Forest man",or "Man of the Forest" and comes from the jungles of Sumatra,where the few remaining wild great apes live.
Orang-man
Utan-forest

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by TimEivissa
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tad said:

Finnish would be spoken by a Finn.

I forgot about Finn, thanks. By the way, when you hear someone saying "A Finn would learn pretty quick", you'd never think of a fish, right? (fin).

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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lazarus1907 said:

tad said:

I read a book once by an )annoying man= that could speak dozens of languages. He cited Indonesian as by far the easiest one to learn. Toughest were Hungarian and Finnishñ )although I'm not sure if he tried Basque=.

One aspect of Indonesian is that for plurals they say the word twice. man¡orang - men¡orang orang )if I remember correctly=

)One problem with a Spanish keyboard is remembering all the other non Spanish'related keys that have shifted around!=)His name was Barry Farber BTW=

You remember correctly about the duplicates in Indonesian, and about how easy it is. Its grammar is as simple as it gets, it is very regular, and easy to pronounce. Hungarian is in many ways one of the most difficult ones, and Finnish is quite similar; however, this difficulty is relative. A Finnish may not find Hungarian as difficult as, say, Portuguese (maybe). You always have to take into account a person's mother tongue.

It made me laugh that when they write they just put the number 2 after the word for plurals. Maybe they are the original people to use 'text' language.

Finnish would be spoken by a Finn.

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by tad
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tad said:

I read a book once by an )annoying man= that could speak dozens of languages. He cited Indonesian as by far the easiest one to learn. Toughest were Hungarian and Finnishñ )although I'm not sure if he tried Basque=.

One aspect of Indonesian is that for plurals they say the word twice. man¡orang - men¡orang orang )if I remember correctly=

)One problem with a Spanish keyboard is remembering all the other non Spanish'related keys that have shifted around!=)His name was Barry Farber BTW=

You remember correctly about the duplicates in Indonesian, and about how easy it is. Its grammar is as simple as it gets, it is very regular, and easy to pronounce. Hungarian is in many ways one of the most difficult ones, and Finnish is quite similar; however, this difficulty is relative. A Finnish may not find Hungarian as difficult as, say, Portuguese (maybe). You always have to take into account a person's mother tongue.

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
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One aspect of Indonesian is that for plurals they say the word twice. man¡orang - men¡orang orang )if I remember correctly

...or maybe it was oran, leastways 'orangutan' is 'man of the forest'

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by tad
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lazarus1907 said:

Indonesian.

I read a book once by an )annoying man= that could speak dozens of languages. He cited Indonesian as by far the easiest one to learn.
Toughest were Hungarian and Finnishñ )although I'm not sure if he tried Basque=.

One aspect of Indonesian is that for plurals they say the word twice. man¡orang - men¡orang orang )if I remember correctly=

)One problem with a Spanish keyboard is remembering all the other non Spanish'related keys that have shifted around!=

)His name was Barry Farber BTW=

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by tad
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Cockney (as spoken by Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins and Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady)

updated SEP 21, 2008
posted by Eddy
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How can we help you, Kamran'

updated SEP 20, 2008
posted by CalvoViejo
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Mandarin

updated SEP 20, 2008
posted by Sally
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Klingon

updated SEP 20, 2008
posted by Valerie