aquí, acá

1
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What is the difference in usage or meaning between these two words: Aquí y acá? I've been using aquí exclusively for "here", but when I asked a Colombian fisherman in the Islas del Rosario, "¿Es de aquí'", he answered, "Sí, soy de acá," indicating the islands around us. Also, somebody said to me the other day, "Ven acᨠinstead of "Ven acquí." Is this a regional issue, or is there some subtlety I'm missing'

11289 views
updated DIC 12, 2011
posted by rob-andi

6 Answers

1
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My Colombian friend tells me that "acá" is a little less formal. He tells me that it doesn't sound good to say "ven para aquí." It is better to say "ven para acá" OR "ven aquí." When I asked for a little more information, he said that "aquí" is a little more specific. "Ven para acá" means the speaker wants you close by. "Ven aquí" means the speaker wants you in an exact location, right beside him (her).

I get the sense that "ven aquí" is probably a little more authoritarian. That is, a boss might say that to an employee. A friend would probably use the "... acá", but that's my own sense of the expression. I also get the sense that when "para" or "por" are used, there is a little less specificity, as "I'll see you in the morning" would be "nos veremos por la mañana," but "I'll see you at 8:00 in the morning" would be "nos veremos a las ocho de la mañana."

I hope I didn't cloud the issue.

updated DIC 12, 2011
posted by CalvoViejo
1
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My Spanish grammar book explains acá as a being "Here" but with motion. Now, how that matches with reality and actual usage might be a different story. So using acá for "Ven para acá" makes perfect sense. Even what the fisherman said makes sense because for him all the surrounding islands are where he's from.

As I said though, what the book says and actual usage may vary and contents may settle during shipment. wink

updated DIC 12, 2011
posted by Difster
0
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lazarus1907 said:

James Santiago said:

This is definitely more common in the Americas.

More common in the Americas than... where?

When I read "Ven pa'cá", all I can think of is people from my city, in Spain.

It's good to know that it's used in Spain, or at least in Sevilla, but I thought you or someone else here once said that the abbreviation pa' was mainly a Latin American usage.

My knowledge of how Spanish is used in Spain is spotty at best, because when I was in Spain many years ago, I could speak almost no Spanish (only knew the words most Californians grow up knowing). In fact, I got by by using French in a sort of Spanish way, which effective some times and completely useless at other times. For example, I was traveling with a female friend, and we wanted to ask a woman if the room she was renting had two beds. Bed in French is lit, so I was asking if she had a room with "dos litos," "dos litas," "dos litanos," etc. Naturally, all I got in reply was a puzzled look.

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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James Santiago said:

This is definitely more common in the Americas.

More common in the Americas than... where?
When I read "Ven pa'cá", all I can think of is people from my city, in Spain.

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Although both words mean the same, aqui (as far, as I know ) is considered more formal Spanish than the word acá.

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by 00769608
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Frequency of use may be affected by region, but I think these words are both understandable everywhere. And as far as I know, they are synonymous. Around here (California) you'll here things like "Ven pa'cá" a lot, which means "Ven para acá," or "Come over here." This is definitely more common in the Americas.

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00bacfba