HomeQ&AEnsena?

Ensena?

0
votes

Ok, I cant find the word Ensena? What is it'

3984 views
updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by emily6

15 Answers

1
vote

Another example is the verb "enpomar", ussually misspelled as "empomar". I won't tell the meaning. Just look by yourself. Not in the dictionary though.

tad said:

James Santiago said:

Hehe. Actually, it's a standard Spanish equation for making a verb.En + noun or adjective root + verb ending = ensenar. The noun here is seno, bosom. So it means "to embosam." winkThat's interesting. I've just been flicking through the dictionary looking at some other 'en....' words.I like the idea that this could be used to make up your own words(')eg if I came out with 'enmelazar' -to cover with treacle (maybe describing a pudding recipe) do you think it might be understood'Same construction as in many other words such as enfriar (frío), enchilar (chile), encordar (cuerda), etc.

That's interesting. I've just been flicking through the dictionary looking at some other 'en....' words.I like the idea that this could be used to make up your own wordseg if I came out with 'enmelazar' -to cover with treacle (maybe describing a pudding recipe) do you think it might be understood?

>

updated DIC 26, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
0
votes

tad said:

. You have a verb for 'to hide something in ones breasts'? lazarus, I am sure you are making some of this stuff up. grin

No, I didn't make it up. Click [url=http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta'TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=ensenar]here[/url]

:

:

ensenar. (De en- y seno). 1. tr. Esconder, poner en el seno algo. 2. tr. Mar. Meter en una ensenada una embarcación. U. m. c. prnl.

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

Regarding verbs formed with en- mentioned by James, there can be about a thousand verbs recognized in the dictionary, but of course, you could always come up with new ones. Among other examples:

viejo - envejecer
gordo - engordar
grasa - engrasar
jaula - enjaular

:

:

en-. (Del lat. in-). 1. pref. Toma la forma em- ante b o p. Frecuentemente forma verbos y adjetivos parasintéticos. Empalizar, embrutecer, encapado. Significa 'dentro de' o 'sobre'. Encajonar, enlatar, embotellar, empapelar, empastar.

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

>

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

James Santiago said:

Hehe. Actually, it's a standard Spanish equation for making a verb. En + noun or adjective root + verb ending = ensenar.

The noun here is seno, bosom. So it means "to embosam." wink

That's interesting. I've just been flicking through the dictionary looking at some other 'en....' words.

I like the idea that this could be used to make up your own words(')

eg if I came out with 'enmelazar' -to cover with treacle (maybe describing a pudding recipe) do you think it might be understood?

Same construction as in many other words such as enfriar (frío), enchilar (chile), encordar (cuerda), etc.

That's interesting. I've just been flicking through the dictionary looking at some other 'en....' words.
I like the idea that this could be used to make up your own words
eg if I came out with 'enmelazar' -to cover with treacle (maybe describing a pudding recipe) do you think it might be understood'

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by tad
0
votes

Hehe. Actually, it's a standard Spanish equation for making a verb.

En + noun or adjective root + verb ending = ensenar.

The noun here is seno, bosom. So it means "to embosam." wink

Same construction as in many other words such as enfriar (frío), enchilar (chile), encordar (cuerda), etc.

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Ok, here we go again:
Ensena = (she) hides something in her breasts

. You have a verb for 'to hide something in ones breasts'?
lazarus, I am sure you are making some of this stuff up. grin

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by tad
0
votes

Gus said:

is the word ensena derived from the word senos? I was unable to find ensena in my dictionary.

Yes, it is derived form "seno", and it is extremely rare too (out of use, actually), which is why you couldn't find it in your dictionary. I just included it to illustrate my point about the ÿ.

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

is the word ensena derived from the word senos? I was unable to find ensena in my dictionary.

lazarus1907 said:

Jerry said:

Therefore: ensena = he teaches (or displays or shows)

Ok, here we go again:Ensena = (she) hides something in her breasts / (he/she) brings the boat into a cove/bayBut this most likely it is a mistake, and what you want is written with ÿ:Enseña = (he/she) teaches / showsThe ÿ is not an N with a tilde, but a letter on its own; it sounds different, it is spelled different, and you get a different meaning.

>

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
votes

Oops, there I go again tripping over ñ. Thanks, Lazarus, for the reminder.

lazarus1907 said:

Jerry said:

Therefore: ensena = he teaches (or displays or shows)

Ok, here we go again:

Ensena = (she) hides something in her breasts / (he/she) brings the boat into a cove/bay

But this most likely it is a mistake, and what you want is written with ÿ:

Enseña = (he/she) teaches / shows

The ÿ is not an N with a tilde, but a letter on its own; it sounds different, it is spelled different, and you get a different meaning.

>

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by Jerry
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

Gus said:

The letter n just before the letter a is missing its hat. I remembered just know that there is a little poem about the letter ñ missing its hot. But can't remember where,I read it. I'll think about it, hope it'll come to me. I will posted if , I can find it.

Check one of my posts about the letter ÿ. The mathematical shape called cone changes its meaning radically if you use the ñ instead of the n.


Becomes a "frustrated cone". perhaps? jeje

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

Gus said:

The letter n just before the letter a is missing its hat. I remembered just know that there is a little poem about the letter ñ missing its hot.

But can't remember where,I read it. I'll think about it, hope it'll come to me. I will posted if , I can find it.

Check one of my posts about the letter ÿ. The mathematical shape called cone changes its meaning radically if you use the ñ instead of the n.

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

The letter n just before the letter a is missing its hat.
I remembered just know that there is a little poem about the letter ñ missing its hot.
But can't remember where,I read it. I'll think about it, hope it'll come to me. I will posted if , I can find it.

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
votes

Jerry said:

Therefore: ensena = he teaches (or displays or shows)

Ok, here we go again:

Ensena = (she) hides something in her breasts / (he/she) brings the boat into a cove/bay

But this most likely it is a mistake, and what you want is written with ÿ:

Enseña = (he/she) teaches / shows

The ÿ is not an N with a tilde, but a letter on its own; it sounds different, it is spelled different, and you get a different meaning.

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Emily, double click on the word:

enseñar

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

you jus need to now how to write the ñ so you don't get confused

Alt 164 ñ
Alt 165 ÿ

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by Erika-Barrera
0
votes

Therefore: ensena = he teaches (or displays or shows)

Lewis said:

What you mean is enseñar.

It means to display, teach, or show.

>

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by Jerry
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.