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Hola, hay otra manera para decir "fireworks" en vez de fuegos artificiales? En Mexico dicen cohetes, verdad'

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updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by Chrystal

18 Answers

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En Argentina tambien les dicen cohetes, pero es para los que solo hacen ruido (petardos también). No es para fuegos artificiales en general.

updated DIC 26, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
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Jerry said:

In Mexico, another particular type of very creative fireworks are "toros de luzes" (literally "bulls of light"). These are large wicker frames, often in the forms of people or animals, that are festooned with fireworks. Since fireworks are a guy thing, men or boys will wear the wicker frames and run through the crowds as the fireworks explode. Rockets shoot out from the toros de luzes and careen wildly between people. Dangerous but lots of fun.

Another fireworks tradition which I enjoy in our little town of San Miguel de Allende is during Easter (Pasqua). In the town plaza are hung life-size paper-mache effigies of politicians stuffed with fireworks then exploded. On our living room wall hangs a disembodied paper-mache head of former president Carlos Salinas which had suffered just such a fate.

Gone are the days when we could do similar dangerous things in England. Alas no more. Politically correctness police will not allow it.

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by Eddy
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In Mexico, another particular type of very creative fireworks are "toros de luzes" (literally "bulls of light"). These are large wicker frames, often in the forms of people or animals, that are festooned with fireworks. Since fireworks are a guy thing, men or boys will wear the wicker frames and run through the crowds as the fireworks explode. Rockets shoot out from the toros de luzes and careen wildly between people. Dangerous but lots of fun.

Another fireworks tradition which I enjoy in our little town of San Miguel de Allende is during Easter (Pasqua). In the town plaza are hung life-size paper-mache effigies of politicians stuffed with fireworks then exploded. On our living room wall hangs a disembodied paper-mache head of former president Carlos Salinas which had suffered just such a fate.

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by Jerry
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Others have noted that cohetes and cuetes are used for fireworks in Mexico, but I know that fuegos and fuegos artificiales are also used. I was living with a family in Guadalajara and we were planning to go see a parade and fireworks. Everyone in the extended family referred to them as "los fuegos." Since "fuegos artificiales" is a mouthful, I guess many just say fuegos when the meaning is understood.

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I had thought of making a reference to Hamlet but 1) I'm not sure that "petard" makes it way into bowdlerized versions of Shakespeare's works (since I've never read such versions) and 2) what with all that business (to Ophelia) about getting herself t a nunnery, I feared that the entire paly might be on the "index".

P.S. for Heidita, I think my all time favorite phrase in French is "Ca ne vaut pas un pet de lapin!" (I found that as an illustrative example of the usage of "pet" in some edition of Larousse many years ago).

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by samdie
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cuete is the word for firecracker as used in Guatemala and Mexico,Dictionary not withstanding
Also is slang for getting drunk or beig drunk

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00769608
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In Spain, or at least in my city, Seville, "cohete" is a small rocket that you fire for fun. If you get many of them, and specially when they shine in the sky, we talk about "fuegos artificiales". People who don't like them, because they are noisy, normally, tend to call them all cohetes; when it is a show worth seeing people tend to say "fuegos artificiales".

"Petardos" are only those who explode with a loud bang, and don't normally fly. This word, as samdie says, has a rather funny and interesting etymology, which explains the coincidence of the meanings given to all these rocket-like words. Whether we keep this family friendly, or not, the word can be found in one of Shakespeare's book, by the way.

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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"petardo" also has an interesting/amusing etymology. But since we're keeping it "family-friendly"...

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by samdie
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James Santiago said:

This is from WR:cuete, sustantivo masculino1. (Méx, RPl fam) (borrachera): agarrar un ~ to get plastered (colloq)2. (AmL fam) (petardo) firecracker3. (Per fam) (pistola) shooter (colloq), rod (sl)4. (Méx) (Coc) braising steak

Y todo dice familiar o coloquial, y pone el país.

En ESpaña no existe.

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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This is from WR:

cuete, sustantivo masculino

  1. (Méx, RPl fam) (borrachera): agarrar un ~ to get plastered (colloq)

  2. (AmL fam) (petardo) firecracker

  3. (Per fam) (pistola) shooter (colloq), rod (sl)

  4. (Méx) (Coc) braising steak

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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This is the definition:

*cuete.
1. adj. coloq. Méx. ebrio (? embriagado por la bebida).

  1. m. Méx. Corte de carne que se saca del muslo de la res.

  2. m. Méx. borrachera (? efecto de emborracharse).*

Not even close to cohete.

By the way: as a joke we often say: cobete

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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I'm almost sure that cuete is a misspelling and misspronunciation of cohete. With the common use it has become a new word.

James Santiago said:

Ivette Navarro said:

well the most common word in Mexico is cuetes

As I understand it, a cuete is a firecracker (petardo). Its meaning may be expanded, I suppose, to include sky fireworks, but strictly speaking it is a noisemaker. Have you heard it used for sky fireworks? Is it possible that people are just mispronouncing cohetes? The pronunciations are very close.

>

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00e657d4
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Hi James. That's how we use it in Argentina. I guess it might be used different in Mexico. What you say makes sense.

James Santiago said:

Guillermo said:

En Argentina tambien les dicen cohetes, pero es para los que solo hacen ruido (petardos también). No es para fuegos artificiales en general.

I've heard cohetes used for fireworks, too, but the word basically means rockets, so it is my understanding that it is only properly used to refer to fireworks that are launched into the sky. The fireworks that just make noise, or shoot up a shower of sparks, but remain on the ground, are not called cohetes.Am I mistaken, Guillermo?

>

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00e657d4
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Ivette Navarro said:

well the most common word in Mexico is cuetes

As I understand it, a cuete is a firecracker (petardo). Its meaning may be expanded, I suppose, to include sky fireworks, but strictly speaking it is a noisemaker. Have you heard it used for sky fireworks? Is it possible that people are just mispronouncing cohetes? The pronunciations are very close.

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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well the most common word in Mexico is cuetes

updated SEP 16, 2008
posted by LA-CHUPON
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