para que mirando

0
votes

Un problema con este parte de la frase

Nunca antes compré un vestido de fiesta tan rápido; pero cuando ves algo que realmente te gusta , para que sequir mirando!

Never before have I bought a party dress so fast, but when you see something you like, so that to continue looking!

It doesn't make sense to me, maybe if they had added "no necesita"

Also they have an exclamation at the end, so shouldn't there be one in front of para'

2264 views
updated ABR 10, 2012
posted by motley

12 Answers

0
votes

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updated ABR 10, 2012
posted by 0031c0ec
0
votes

motley said:

lazarus,

I had never seen that punctuation before. When samdie said to use both, I thought it would be

¿¡para qué preocuparse'! I always need an example.

Samdie was probably thinking the same as you. The way I showed above is what the RAE recommends.

updated SEP 18, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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votes

motley said:

*In Spanish, or at least that is what is taught in schools, you start with one symbol, and finish with the other:

¿Para qué preocuparse!

¡Para qué preocuparse'*

lazarus,

I had never seen that punctuation before. When samdie said to use both, I thought it would be

¿¡para qué preocuparse'! I always need an example.

¿Por qué? - Why? (what´s the reason)
¿Para qué? - What for? (what's the purpose)

updated SEP 18, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
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Neither have I seen this punctuation before.

updated SEP 18, 2008
posted by Dunia
0
votes

*In Spanish, or at least that is what is taught in schools, you start with one symbol, and finish with the other:

¿Para qué preocuparse!
¡Para qué preocuparse'*

lazarus,
I had never seen that punctuation before. When samdie said to use both, I thought it would be
¿¡para qué preocuparse'! I always need an example.

updated SEP 18, 2008
posted by motley
0
votes

I'llbe dog -gone, I did not knew that rule about the signs. I hope. I can remenber this rule. The great thing about this site is that it has a human touch, meaning I can make mistakes and learn about them from other persons, it is easier than having to learn from a book.

lazarus1907 said:

motley said:

Gracias I knew it would be something simple, but if you don't know, you don't know. Shouldn't the explanation mark be a question mark? That would have given me a clue.

Of course it should, and there should be another one just before "para" too to give you the warning! That's why I think that use the opening exclamation and interrogation marks are necessary.

samdie said:

It could be punctuated so as to make it a question. But if the intent is to assert that "there's no point in looking further" (i.e. the question is really rhetorical)., one could, equally, treat it as an exclamation. A compromise solution (in English) would be to use both a question mark and an exclamation point.

In Spanish, or at least that is what is taught in schools, you start with one symbol, and finish with the other:¿Para qué preocuparse!¡Para qué preocuparse?

>

updated SEP 18, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
votes

motley said:

Gracias I knew it would be something simple, but if you don't know, you don't know. Shouldn't the explanation mark be a question mark? That would have given me a clue.

Of course it should, and there should be another one just before "para" too to give you the warning! That's why I think that use the opening exclamation and interrogation marks are necessary.

samdie said:

It could be punctuated so as to make it a question. But if the intent is to assert that "there's no point in looking further" (i.e. the question is really rhetorical)., one could, equally, treat it as an exclamation. A compromise solution (in English) would be to use both a question mark and an exclamation point.

In Spanish, or at least that is what is taught in schools, you start with one symbol, and finish with the other:

¿Para qué preocuparse!
¡Para qué preocuparse'

updated SEP 18, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

(...and of course sequir should be seguir)

updated SEP 18, 2008
posted by tad
0
votes

motley said:

Gracias I knew it would be something simple, but if you don't know, you don't know. Shouldn't the explanation mark be a question mark? That would have given me a clue.

I appreciate corrections to the accents also. I just checked the sentence & que didn't have one. I am disappointed with myself that I didn't notice. (I don't know what, if any, the convention would be in Spansi.h)

This learning site also had the word acojedora, which I had no idea what it meant, another error, all the sites led me to acogedora which means, cosy, warm. It just means you can get the best information here.


It could be punctuated so as to make it a question. But if the intent is to assert that "there's no point in looking further" (i.e. the question is really rhetorical)., one could, equally, treat it as an exclamation. A compromise solution (in English) would be to use both a question mark and an exclamation point.

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

Gracias I knew it would be something simple, but if you don't know, you don't know. Shouldn't the explanation mark be a question mark? That would have given me a clue.

I appreciate corrections to the accents also. I just checked the sentence & que didn't have one. I am disappointed with myself that I didn't notice.

This learning site also had the word acojedora, which I had no idea what it meant, another error, all the sites led me to acogedora which means, cosy, warm. It just means you can get the best information here.

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by motley
0
votes

why keep looking is the translation of your sentence and not, so that to continue looking

your first sentence is correct
and, yes there is a need for a ! preceding the letter p

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
votes

It means "why keep looking'" The "why" here is literally "what for," but we often use "what for" to mean "why" in English, too. There is a missing accent on qué.

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by 00bacfba