dl

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Is dl used a an abbreviation for de la'

1765 views
updated SEP 18, 2009
posted by Carma-Lee

8 Answers

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thanks, I stand corrected.

lazarus1907 said:

No, it is not.

Ja,ja,ja or ha,ha,ha'' the above is funny, I just notice it. lazarus kept insisting that,I should start a sentence with a Capital letter and me being me, never noticed the message. Thanks Lazarus 1907

updated SEP 18, 2009
edited by 00769608
posted by 00769608
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Thank you for your help.

updated SEP 14, 2008
posted by Carma-Lee
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Carma Lee said:

Thank you for your replies. The dl was used in an old Spanish record from the early 1800's. The phrase "soldado dl Regimto." So I assume it meant soldier of the Regiment.

Gus said:

thanks, I stand corrected.

lazarus1907 said:

No, it is not.


Overwhelmingly likely. It wouldn't be an acceptable abbreviation in modern Spanish but many things were abbreviated 2-3 centuries ago (especially since they were writing everything in "longhand") that are no longer standard.) Of course, it may also be a simple misprint for "del".

updated SEP 14, 2008
posted by samdie
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Thank you for your replies. The dl was used in an old Spanish record from the early 1800's.
The phrase "soldado dl Regimto." So I assumed it meant soldier of the Regiment.

updated SEP 14, 2008
posted by Carma-Lee
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If you were to provide reasonable contextual information, there is a good chance that someone will help you with your real question. (Since you provided no context and phrased your question as one calling for a simple "yes/no" answer, you should not be too disappointed with the replies that you got.)

updated SEP 14, 2008
posted by samdie
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de +el is written as del, but there is no analogous construction for de la.

updated SEP 14, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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No, it is not.

updated SEP 14, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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no it is not.

updated SEP 14, 2008
posted by 00769608