Entre niños te veas

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This is a section in "Selecciones" for funny stories about kids. I would say it means: "Among children you see yourself." This doesn't sound entirely like the right translation to me; anybody have an idea'

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updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by Pergolesi

6 Answers

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There was a 1988 movie called Entre Compadres Te Veas, which has been translated as You Find Yourself Among Friends. The Selecciones title may be related to this title, or both may may derive from something earlier.

Googling "te veas" turns up a wealth of similar phrases, in which niños is replaced by cornudos, mujeres, nalgas, geeks, urias, perros y gatos, cholos, and just about anything else you can think of. Clearly, this is a popular construction, and many people are playing on it.

Good question!

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Thanx for the answers. Unfortunately I still don't have translation that really makes sense. Lazarus' reply suggests (Ojalá) entre niños te veas, which looks to me like: "(I hope) you see yourself among children," or something like that. It makes kinda sense, but as a title for a section of funny stories there must be something I'm missing. I suppose to a childless person such a comment might be well-wishes on positive results in the marriage bed. LIke, "I hope that soon you are surrounded by the patter of little feet." Because it is in Selecciones (Reader's Digest) I wouldn't think any idiom such as that would be that obscure.

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by Pergolesi
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The sentence is not incorrectly grammatically, but it requires a context to give it at least an implicit main sentence or structure to be subordinated to:

(Ojalá) te veas entre niños...
(Espero que) te veas entre niños...

If the sentence is commonly used, the part in brackets will be omitted, but if you are not familiar with it, it sounds incomplete, because you cannot really reconstruct the full meaning without a context or listening to the voice and expression of the speaker as he says it. Otherwise it sounds archaic.

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Although this doesn't help answer the question at all, the corresponding section in English was called Kids Say the Darnest Things. I, too, am curious as to how this Spanish title came to be, since it doesn't seem grammatical.

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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lazarus1907 said:

That sentence, alone, doesn't make sense, because it depends on another sentence, which is the one that gives it full meaning. The subjunctive cannot be used in isolation, since it is not used in declarations. We need the whole text.

While I agree with you, this phrase is pretty common on the Internet, and is the title of a section, as Pergolesi says. These include 'gajes del oficio', 'así es la vida', 'entre niños te veas', 'humor en uniforme? y 'la risa, remedio infalible.? These are all translations of titles of sections of the Reader's Digest magazine.

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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That sentence, alone, doesn't make sense, because it depends on another sentence, which is the one that gives it full meaning. The subjunctive cannot be used in isolation, since it is not used in declarations.
We need the whole text.

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by lazarus1907