HomeQ&AQuiero algo para tomar.

Quiero algo para tomar.

0
votes

I was on another Spanish web site and they said "Quiero algo para tomar" means "I want something to drink". I thought Tomar means "to take" and Beber means "to drink". Can you please explain this to me. I am so confused.

14726 views
updated SEP 4, 2008
posted by ztaylor

11 Answers

0
votes

These two works have the same meaning, it depend on your own preference. For me, I use tomar, this word is more common in America.

updated SEP 4, 2008
posted by Favorito
0
votes

Heidita said:

Eddy said:

motley said:

I'm wondering when you would use beber. It seems tomar is used for everything having to do with eating & drinking.

Hi MotleyThey would use beber in certain instances. I was in a bar in Spain, drinking with some friends when the waiter came to my table saying ¿quiere algo más para beber'. He knew I was drinking and asked if I wanted any more drink.

This is be , however, rather unusual. The normal question would have been:¿Quiere tomar algo más? ¿Quiere otra copa/otro vino/ otra cerveza'The question your waiter asked sounds very unusual to me.

I didn't say he was Spanish but he had worked in Spain for some twenty years. Obviously by your comments he needs a bit more time to refine the language.hehehe

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Eddy said:

motley said:

I'm wondering when you would use beber. It seems tomar is used for everything having to do with eating & drinking.

Hi MotleyThey would use beber in certain instances. I was in a bar in Spain, drinking with some friends when the waiter came to my table saying ¿quiere algo más para beber'. He knew I was drinking and asked if I wanted any more drink.


This is be , however, rather unusual. The normal question would have been:

¿Quiere tomar algo más? ¿Quiere otra copa/otro vino/ otra cerveza?

The question your waiter asked sounds very unusual to me.

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

I guess it would be used if you are both eating and drinking, otherwise, how would they know whether you wanted something to beber o comer?

Eddy said:

motley said:

I'm wondering when you would use beber. It seems tomar is used for everything having to do with eating & drinking.

Hi Motley

They would use beber in certain instances. I was in a bar in Spain, drinking with some friends when the waiter came to my table saying ¿quiere algo más para beber'. He knew I was drinking and asked if I wanted any more drink.

>

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by motley
0
votes

motley said:

I'm wondering when you would use beber. It seems tomar is used for everything having to do with eating & drinking.

Hi Motley
They would use beber in certain instances. I was in a bar in Spain, drinking with some friends when the waiter came to my table saying ¿quiere algo más para beber'. He knew I was drinking and asked if I wanted any more drink.

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

I'm wondering when you would use beber. It seems tomar is used for everything having to do with eating & drinking.

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by motley
0
votes

Gracias a todos. Yo lo entiendo mejor ahora.

updated SEP 3, 2008
posted by ztaylor
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

It is simple: many words have several meanings, both in Spanish and in English. Don't expect most common verbs to have a perfect equivalent on the other language, because it doesn't work like that. For example, you'll need over 40 different Spanish verbs to translate "to get" in every context, and over 18 English verbs to translate "poner".

The verb "tomar" has as many as 38 meanings, most of which can be translated as "take"; you can also use it as "drink" and "eat" (imagine the person taking the food or the drink into his mouth).


"partake" (obviously related to "take") still has (as its secondary meaning) "to eat/drink". It's a bit literary/old-fashioned now (but used to be fairly common).

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

In Mexico, we use tomar in daily conversation. But, I only heard beber from the lecture. Either way, we would understand you.

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by Favorito
0
votes

It is simple: many words have several meanings, both in Spanish and in English. Don't expect most common verbs to have a perfect equivalent on the other language, because it doesn't work like that. For example, you'll need over 40 different Spanish verbs to translate "to get" in every context, and over 18 English verbs to translate "poner".

The verb "tomar" has as many as 38 meanings, most of which can be translated as "take"; you can also use it as "drink" and "eat" (imagine the person taking the food or the drink into his mouth).

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Hi taylor!

I Spain we use tomar (double click, it is listed this way)) as

beber
comer

So, if they ask you in a bar: ¿Qué va a tomar'
it can mean: what would you like to drink /to eat.

In a normal cafeteria for example, we might ask then for "un café y una tostada"

The best translation: to have

What are you having? A beer and a sandwich.

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by 00494d19
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.