No sabes ni a quién odias

0
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More from 'Trampa 22'

'No pienso discutir contigo? concluyó Clevinger 'No sabes ni a quién odias.

I guess: 'I'm not going to argue with you'.....'you don't (even) know who you hate'

Later on the same page:
'¡Y ni siquiera era veneno!'exclamó...

I guess: 'it wasn't even poison'

It's the use of ni in these constructions I'm not sure about , both seem to be 'not even' yet one has 'siquiera' and the other not

Also, to me it would seem to my English ears leaving out the first 'ni' would still make the sentence understandable.

Any insights into the use of 'ni' gratefully received.

3024 views
updated SEP 4, 2008
posted by tad

15 Answers

1
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I would just make a small change. "No sabes ni a quien odias" is more like "You don't even know who you hate." Putting the verv in inifinitive, like you did, changes the meaning a little bit.
I think all the rest is perfect.

updated DIC 24, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
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lazarus1907 said:

Natasha said:

Yes, Lazarus, a couple of your awesome examples would really help here . . . but of course you would not want to give away too many of your secrets wink

Well, in English you normally put it between the "don't" and the verb:I don't even know how to help you.The car doesn't even have four doors.but in Spanish is more flexible:(Yo) ni siquiera sé cómo ayudarte.Ni siquiera yo sé cómo ayudarte.No sé ni siquiera cómo ayudarte.That's what I meant by placement.

Thanks amo/maestro what I was really after was the use of siquiera....in the examples you gave could siquiera be left out -and if it was would it change any nuance of meaning'

updated SEP 4, 2008
posted by tad
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

Natasha said:

Yes, Lazarus, a couple of your awesome examples would really help here . . . but of course you would not want to give away too many of your secrets wink

Well, in English you normally put it between the "don't" and the verb:I don't even know how to help you.The car doesn't even have four doors.but in Spanish is more flexible:(Yo) ni siquiera sé cómo ayudarte.Ni siquiera yo sé cómo ayudarte.No sé ni siquiera cómo ayudarte.That's what I meant by placement.

Thank you, much clearer!

updated SEP 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
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Natasha said:

Yes, Lazarus, a couple of your awesome examples would really help here . . . but of course you would not want to give away too many of your secrets wink

Well, in English you normally put it between the "don't" and the verb:

I don't even know how to help you.
The car doesn't even have four doors.

but in Spanish is more flexible:

(Yo) ni siquiera sé cómo ayudarte.
Ni siquiera yo sé cómo ayudarte.
No sé ni siquiera cómo ayudarte.

That's what I meant by placement.

updated SEP 4, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
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tad said:

lazarus1907 said:

ni siquiera = not evenThe difference is the placement of the words on the sentence.

Thanks everyone -although Lazarus' last comment was a little cryptic!

Yes, Lazarus, a couple of your awesome examples would really help here . . . but of course you would not want to give away too many of your secrets wink

updated SEP 4, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
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lazarus1907 said:

ni siquiera = not even

The difference is the placement of the words on the sentence.


Thanks everyone -although Lazarus' last comment was a little cryptic!

updated SEP 4, 2008
posted by tad
0
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updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
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ni siquiera = not even

The difference is the placement of the words on the sentence.

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
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lazarus1907 said:

tad said:

and likewise would '¡Y ni era veneno!'exclamó... (that just doesn't even look right...but I'm not sure why.

It looks right to me: "and it wasn't even poison!".

So ni siquiera is further (optional) emphasis then'

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by tad
0
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tad said:

and likewise would '¡Y ni era veneno!'exclamó... (that just doesn't even look right...but I'm not sure why.

It looks right to me: "and it wasn't even poison!".

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
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Heidita said:

No sabes ni a quién odias. You don't even know who you hate.

No sabes a quién odias.

You don't know who you hate.

Ah, OK thats kind of what I thought, but in the second example siquiera is used too
so would 'No sabes ni siquiera a quién odias.' make sense, change the meaning, be wrong...?

and likewise would '¡Y ni era veneno!'exclamó... (that just doesn't even look right...but I'm not sure why.

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by tad
0
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lazarus1907 said:

Guillermo said:

I would just make a small change. "No sabes ni a quien odias" is more like "You don't even know who you hate."

But don't forget the accent on "quién".


Blame it to my English keyboard. I'm so used to not putting the tildes. I had to change this to write in this forum, but sometimes I just forget.

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by 00e657d4
0
votes

No sabes ni a quién odias.

You don't even know who you hate.

No sabes a quién odias.

You don't know who you hate.

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Guillermo said:

I would just make a small change. "No sabes ni a quien odias" is more like "You don't even know who you hate."

But don't forget the accent on "quién".

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Thanks Guillermo, I've changed the original (I did mean to put that ...honest)

...so if ni was left out, would it be wrong'

updated SEP 2, 2008
posted by tad