...aunque fuera de forma limitada.

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therefore outside the liability? any ideas anyone''

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updated AGO 28, 2008
posted by steve3

4 Answers

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James said "Even if it were in a limited manner".

That's the one I like too. Seems to me that when studying Latin grammar, we called that the "concessive subjunctive" and it was fairly popular (at least, with textbook writers).

updated AGO 28, 2008
posted by samdie
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lazarus1907 said:

My guess:

... even though (it is) in a limited matter.

I assume you meant manner, not matter, and yes, that is my guess, too. But I have a question.

I learned, way back when, the following general rule.

Even though = aunque + indicativo
Even if = aunque + subjuntivo

For example:

Aunque llueve, quiero ir.
Even though it's raining, I want to go.
Aunque llueva, voy a ir.
Even if it's raining, I'm going.

In the first set, we know that it is raining, and in the second, we don't know if it will rain.

Therefore, wouldn't the translation be "Even if it were in a limited manner"'

updated AGO 27, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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My guess:

... even though (it is) in a limited matter.

More context needed.

updated AGO 27, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Just guessing here, without any more context, but I think fuera is not outside, but the past subjunctive of ser.

...even if it was of limited form.

updated AGO 27, 2008
posted by 00bacfba