Sorry - perdonar (o perd贸n) vs. disculpar

0
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When would one use each of these words?

I know perdón is used to get someone's attention, and sometimes for "sorry".

I was taught to use "discúlpeme", for example, if accidentally bumping into someone.

However, the general distinction between these words seems a little confusing.

Ane while we're at it . . . what is the polite thing to say (anything') if someone sneezes? Of course, in English, it is the superstitiously-derived "Bless you".

5315 views
updated AGO 26, 2008
posted by Natasha

10 Answers

1
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motley said:

Bless you¡salud!


We use "salud" in Argentina. Never heard someone using a blessing for this.

updated DIC 24, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
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What do you say in Argentina if someone sneezes? I've only heard ¡salud!

Guillermo said:

motley said:

Bless you¡salud!

We use "salud" in Argentina. Never heard someone using a blessing for this.

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updated AGO 26, 2008
posted by motley
0
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samdie said:

Mark W said:

Using the name "Jesus" in English is only considered "swearing" (which is better described as using the Lord's name in vain) if used in the wrong context. After all, when we say "bless you" in English, what are we really saying? We are really saying "God bless you".

Yes. The operative words are "in vain". You "take the Lord's name in vain" when you fail to fulfill an oath made to the Deity (and the problem is not that you _made_ the oath but that you didn't _keep_ your promise).

That's all quite correct; it's just very interesting to consider how the cultural interpretation of such exclamations varies. For example, most of my high school students wouldn't have thought anything about saying "Oh my God! I passed the test!" But if someone in the classroom dropped their calculator and said "Jesus Christ!", everyone would look at them for breaking school rules about using inappropriate language.

updated AGO 26, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
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Mark W said:

Using the name "Jesus" in English is only considered "swearing" (which is better described as using the Lord's name in vain) if used in the wrong context. After all, when we say "bless you" in English, what are we really saying? We are really saying "God bless you".


Yes. The operative words are "in vain". You "take the Lord's name in vain" when you fail to fulfill an oath made to the Deity (and the problem is not that you _made_ the oath but that you didn't _keep_ your promise).

updated AGO 26, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

Using the name "Jesus" in English is only considered "swearing" (which is better described as using the Lord's name in vain) if used in the wrong context. After all, when we say "bless you" in English, what are we really saying? We are really saying "God bless you".

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by Mark-W
0
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Natasha said:

Really!! In English this would be considered swearing by many.

Well... in Spanish -using the right intonation- it can also be used as a (almost religious) interjection of surprise and even shock.

El precio de la gasolina ha subido un 500% hoy. - ¡Jesús (, María y José)!

It is not used to express annoyance as often as in English, and instead of being offensive, it is actually one of the most polite (or religiously correct) alternatives (rather than "¡Joder!", "¡Ostias!", etc.)

I personally like the German "Gesundheit!" more than the Spanish or English answers to a sneeze.

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Natasha said:

lazarus1907 said:

Bless you = ¡Jesús! (in Spain, at least).

Really!! In English this would be considered swearing by many.

I think this is a short form of "Jesús te bendiga." I hear it very often, and even in the sense of "wow!" In Spanish it doesn't sound like swearing.

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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lazarus1907 said:

Bless you = ¡Jesús! (in Spain, at least).

Really!! In English this would be considered swearing by many.

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
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Bless you

¡salud!

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by motley
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Bless you = ¡Jesús! (in Spain, at least).

I don't think there is a significant difference between "perdone" and "disculpe", but I haven't started those two words yet, hehe, so I still need to do a bit of research. I'd say "perdone" is used both before and after something, and "disculpe" is used more before you do or say something inconvenient, but right now I'm only guessing.

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by lazarus1907