HomeQ&Aandar, caminar, ir

andar, caminar, ir

0
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These verbs all express movement to a place. How do I decide which to use when I go out to walk with my dog'

8695 views
updated AGO 23, 2008
posted by Lyndelle

10 Answers

3
votes

"Ir" has always the idea of a destination, even if it is not stated explicitly. It means "to go", and it can be by train, by boat, walking,... The speaker can never be at the destination.

"Andar" means "to walk" (and other non-relevant meanings for your question) in general.

"Caminar" is also "to walk", but the distance is often more specific than in "andar".

updated FEB 8, 2012
posted by lazarus1907
2
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I agree with James on the translations, but the personal A is not necessary. Without it, the animal is an "it", like any other animal that doesn't matter to you; it is a cold, scientific description. With the personal A the animal becomes more "human" or you show your affection towards "him / her", which is a common thing with pets.

I don't care how correct it is in English if I refer to my cat as a "he", but I can't call him "it".

updated FEB 8, 2012
posted by lazarus1907
1
vote

motley said:

I've heard to walk the dog pasear el perro

You would have to use the personal A.

pasear al perro

Also, "sacar al perro a pasear."

updated FEB 8, 2012
posted by 00bacfba
0
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lazarus1907 said:

I agree with James on the translations, but the personal A is not necessary. Without it, the animal is an "it", like any other animal that doesn't matter to you; it is a cold, scientific description. With the personal A the animal becomes more "human" or you show your affection towards "him / her", which is a common thing with pets. I don't care how correct it is in English if I refer to my cat as a "he", but I can't call him "it".


The only thing that would make that incorrect in English would be if your cat were a female. jeje
I very much doubt that there is a pet owner in the English speaking world who would use "it" to refer to his/her own pet and very few who would use it in reference to anyone else's pet either (unless the person didn't know the pet's gender [and that's usually the 1st/2nd question that one asks a pet owner]). In my experience the he/she/it usage in English is the same as what you've stated for Spanish (regarding animals).

updated AGO 23, 2008
posted by samdie
0
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My conclusion is: Ando con mi perra. No specific distance or goal... Just moseying along the river while she sniffs out the other dogs and dumps.

updated AGO 23, 2008
posted by Lyndelle
0
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I saw a picture of a dog jumping over a fence. I thought the dog was escaping the back yard. But the caption read "El perro está caminando."

lazarus1907 said:

"Ir" has always the idea of a destination, even if it is not stated explicitly. It means "to go", and it can be by train, by boat, walking,... The speaker can never be at the destination.

"Andar" means "to walk" (and other non-relevant meanings for your question) in general.

"Caminar" is also "to walk", but the distance is often more specific than in "andar".

>

updated AGO 23, 2008
posted by Lyndelle
0
votes

"sacar al perro a pasear."
I think this is more like what it is I do. I put the harness on my dog, add the leash and we go out for a walk. We walk together. But "sacar" sounds to me like I'm popping her into a box or basket or something. And my dog is a "she", not an "it". grin

lazarus1907 said:

I agree with James on the translations, but the personal A is not necessary. Without it, the animal is an "it", like any other animal that doesn't matter to you; it is a cold, scientific description. With the personal A the animal becomes more "human" or you show your affection towards "him / her", which is a common thing with pets. I don't care how correct it is in English if I refer to my cat as a "he", but I can't call him "it".

>

updated AGO 23, 2008
posted by Lyndelle
0
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lazarus1907 said:

I agree with James on everything.

Hey, I like the sound of that! wink

updated AGO 22, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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$@%& personal a, I always forget it

updated AGO 22, 2008
posted by motley
0
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I've heard to walk the dog

pasear el perro

updated AGO 22, 2008
posted by motley
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