Question about Spanish alphabet

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Could someone post the Spanish Alphabet and how to pronounce the letters'

2784 views
updated ABR 22, 2010
posted by garrett2

9 Answers

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James said:

I'm glad the RAE has done this (it makes sense to me), but all the dictionaries I've seen still list Ch separately, so for practical purposes it is still important to learn this as a distinct letter.

I'm glad too. Virtually all books published in the last 10 years or so use the most logical character-by-character alphabetical arrangement, including the English-Spanish dictionaries published in England. However, I still need to check under Ch and Ll in older books, of course.

updated ABR 22, 2010
posted by lazarus1907
time to buy a new dictionary? mine goes from cfr to chabacano and on
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I just wanted to mention that "w" can be"doble v" or "doble u".

Also, some do not consider "ch", "ll", nor "rr" letters since they are composed of already existing letters.

updated ABR 22, 2010
edited by MeEncantanCarasSonrisas
posted by MeEncantanCarasSonrisas
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It looks like you've gotten some good feedback, but next time, try checking out the reference section if you have a grammar or verb conjugation question. You just might find exactly what you're looking for: the alphabet - pronunciation guide
Buena suerte,
Paralee

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by Paralee
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lazarus1907 said:

James said:

You forgot Ch (che), which comes after C and is a letter in its own right. That is, words that start with Ch come after all the words that start with C.

According to the RAE, Ll and Ch are now regarded just as digraphs, and not as individual letters, like they used to be.

I'm glad the RAE has done this (it makes sense to me), but all the dictionaries I've seen still list Ch separately, so for practical purposes it is still important to learn this as a distinct letter.

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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James said:

You forgot Ch (che), which comes after C and is a letter in its own right. That is, words that start with Ch come after all the words that start with C.


Oops! My bad! Of course, if he wants to learn how to _pronounce_ them (as opposed to their "names" in Spanish) then nothing that I wrote will be of help (but Lazarus has already addressed that interpretation).

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by samdie
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James said:

You forgot Ch (che), which comes after C and is a letter in its own right. That is, words that start with Ch come after all the words that start with C.

According to the RAE, Ll and Ch are now regarded just as digraphs, and not as individual letters, like they used to be.

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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You forgot Ch (che), which comes after C and is a letter in its own right. That is, words that start with Ch come after all the words that start with C.

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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How do you want us to explain to you how to pronounce the letters? Spanish has a few sounds that don't exist in English, and English has a lot of sounds that don't exist in Spanish. On top of that, there is very little resemblance in the way vowels are pronounced in one language and another, so any attempt to teach Spanish pronunciation using English sounds will result in words that will be very difficult to recognize by natives, or at best, with an exaggeratedly strong foreign accent.

The only letters that have practically the same sound in both languages are F, K, M, N, S, W, X.

You need either sounds, or using proper international phonetic alphabet (IPA). If you are familiar with this IPA, I can write the sounds for you here.

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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a
be (also "be grande" or "be de burro" to avoid confusion with "v" [which is pronounced the same])
ce
de
efe
ge
ache
i (some times "i latina")
jota
- (I'm not sure what the official position is on "k". It doesn't occur in any Spanish words but does in some loan words e.g. kiosk)
ele
elle (i.e. double l)
eme
ene
eñe
o
pe
cu
ere
erre
ese
te
uve (or "ve chica" or "ve de vaca" see "b" above)
doble u
equis
y griega (cf. "i")
zeta

updated AGO 25, 2008
posted by samdie