andalucian dialect

2
votes

whilst living in england i was taught the generally accepted spanish language of Castellano.For the past seven years i have lived in the Andalucian village of Competa where all rules of the generally accepeted language `go out the window`.There is no `formal or informal rule, the two blend into one.There is no letter `S` on the end of words and the letter `D` before the last letter of a word is omitted.TRY IT.Is this just peculiar to Andalucia or is this dialect used in other Spanish speaking parts of the world'

3076 views
updated ABR 14, 2012
posted by ray

4 Answers

2
votes

Casimiro is right: after Columbus, all Spanish ships to America departed from Seville for about two centuries, and in the XVI century the local dialect included pronouncing all C as S, aspirating many H and final S, and many other features common in many Latin America countries.

updated MAY 16, 2012
posted by lazarus1907
1
vote

Well this is how a lot of the latinos in central america (puerto rico, cuba, republica dominicana, ...) speak. our spanish came directly from Andaluz. :0) so we have been speaking like that as well. ex. como etah? (como estas) or ehta cera'o. (esta cerado) so its nothing new for us. I think that it has a lot to do with some portuguese influence instead of vagancia. wink however the sad thing happening with the language in the carribean is that the language has been affected so much by the english language. so many words now carry a strong englisg presence. (if that make any sense to you) > But yes. Andalucia is the mother of the spanish in the caribbean do to the sugar cane industry. you might want to try the canary islands as well. i heard that they speak the same as we do too. Casimiro.

updated ABR 14, 2012
posted by Gaarasama
1
vote

Is this how they speak in Cuba? I used to listen to "Radio Martí" and could barely understand it. It was very nasal.

updated ABR 14, 2012
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Casimiro said:

Well this is how a lot of the latinos in central america (puerto rico, cuba, republica dominicana, ...) speak. our spanish came directly from Andaluz. :0) so we have been speaking like that as well. ex. como etah? (como estas) or ehta cera'o. (esta cerado) so its nothing new for us. I think that it has a lot to do with some portuguese influence instead of vagancia. wink however the sad thing happening with the language in the carribean is that the language has been affected so much by the english language. so many words now carry a strong englisg presence. (if that make any sense to you) > But yes. Andalucia is the mother of the spanish in the caribbean do to the sugar cane industry. you might want to try the canary islands as well. i heard that they speak the same as we do too. Casimiro.

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updated AGO 21, 2008
posted by ray