to be bonded

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how can I translate "have you ever been bonded" in relation to a job/construction. I get some definitions but I am unsure which is the proper one. please help.

5518 views
updated AGO 21, 2008
posted by sylvia2

8 Answers

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lazarus1907 said:

Maybe it is just my ignorance, but as far as I know, in that context "to be bonded" can mean several things, depending on what kind of bond you are talking about. The problem is that these small differences which are all included of this word, are translated differently into Spanish. If you give me a specific description of the kind of bond, I can attempt a translation.

In the U.S., the reference to construction made the meaning clear. It is a common phrase: "bonded and insured". For example: if you hire a roofing company to roof your house, be sure the company is bonded and insured. (My father-in-law just lost $11,000 to a fly-by-night company that was NOT bonded . . .)

updated AGO 21, 2008
posted by Natasha
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I would have thought that that meant "Have you ever been engaged (to be married)'

No, engaged (as in betrothed) is comprometido. Afianzado means secured. Afianzarse means to steady oneself: Se afianzó en los estribos / He steadied himself in the stirrups.

updated AGO 21, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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James said:

I have seen "mensajero afianzado" used for "bonded messenger," which is basically the same thing (the company posts a bond (money) with an authority to ensure the proper completion of job duties and to cover possible liabilities). Of course, whether that system exists in other countries and would be understood there is another question, but I think "¿Ud. ha sido afianzado alguna vez? might work. What do others think of that?


I would have thought that that meant "Have you ever been engaged (to be married)'

updated AGO 21, 2008
posted by samdie
0
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James said:

I have seen "mensajero afianzado" used for "bonded messenger," which is basically the same thing (the company posts a bond (money) with an authority to ensure the proper completion of job duties and to cover possible liabilities). Of course, whether that system exists in other countries and would be understood there is another question, but I think "¿Ud. ha sido afianzado alguna vez? might work. What do others think of that?

We have a similar system in England whereby you purchase a bond from a bank. This should guarantee completion of the work if the company has problems.

updated AGO 21, 2008
posted by Eddy
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I have seen "mensajero afianzado" used for "bonded messenger," which is basically the same thing (the company posts a bond (money) with an authority to ensure the proper completion of job duties and to cover possible liabilities). Of course, whether that system exists in other countries and would be understood there is another question, but I think "¿Ud. ha sido afianzado alguna vez? might work. What do others think of that'

updated AGO 21, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I work in the construction market and one of the requirements to work on a job site by subcontractor is to be bonded. Is this enough? I thought it might be similar to garantizado but I'm not sure if it fits.

updated AGO 21, 2008
posted by sylvia2
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you have to be more specific on what you want to say. no good translation can come from this.

updated AGO 21, 2008
posted by Gaarasama
0
votes

Maybe it is just my ignorance, but as far as I know, in that context "to be bonded" can mean several things, depending on what kind of bond you are talking about. The problem is that these small differences which are all included of this word, are translated differently into Spanish. If you give me a specific description of the kind of bond, I can attempt a translation.

updated AGO 21, 2008
posted by lazarus1907