HomeQ&AAny homeschooling parents on the site?

Any homeschooling parents on the site?

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I'm wondering if there are any fellow homeschoolers who have tips and tricks for starting at ground zero teaching Spanish as a school subject. Last week, I posted one way I practice, which is to put in a favorite movie and turn on the Spanish subtitles, pausing after each phrase to practice the translation. We don't have the budget to take a chance on fancy curriculums that we might not like....but we do use our library. They have some good Spanish language books and teaching videos. I'd love to hear other ideas for learning/teaching, and perhaps resources that have proved themselves worthwhile to you. ¡Gracias!

3582 views
updated ENE 24, 2011
posted by Dawn

9 Answers

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I think showing the videos on the learn section of SpanishDict and doing the activities is a great way to get started. I have Rosetta Stone and it is good but I can see where kids may get bored with it. I have found pages on the web such as this one http://www.teach-nology.com/teachers/lesson_plans/languages/spanish/ that has some great activities.

updated ENE 24, 2011
posted by dream4meashley
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i would use "before you know it'', it helps you learn spanish and it's very helpful, easy, and not expensive

updated ENE 24, 2011
posted by afitennistar182
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Hola Dawn!
I am not a homeschooling parent, but I was homeschooled K-12, so perhaps I can contribute a few tidbits =)

My first thought would be to start weaving Spanish words into their everyday life. This is more of a supplement to an actual Spanish course, to reinforce the learning and make the grammar part easier.

for some people, it is much easier to understand the grammar part when you are used to how the words are supposed to sound. The more the kids can simply hear Spanish spoken, the more they will get a feel for how the language "sounds", which will likely make the grammar portion much easier and less tedious.

Make sure you can pronounce the words correctly first (it sounds like you should have no trouble finding someone near you to ask if you don't know for sure), then start giving your kids their huevos in the mañana.

You can make it interactive, so maybe after a few days of you giving them huevos, make them ask for huevos, por favor =). Anything you can remember the Spanish word for, you can start using every day. When your doing -anything-, even if it is in a restaurant looking at the menu, try to remember any words in Spanish that you can and roll them around in your head, it will help dredge up the old highschool Spanish. Then try to use a word or two in conversation with the kids. If your son orders chicken, try telling him that his pollo looks bien!

The ending goal is not to make it sound like your trying to lecture them, but simply to encourage daily practice of what they are learning and give them new things to pick up (they don't have to know a word for you to use it, they'll pick it up soon enough). This is the principal method by which we learned English (listen, roll it around in our heads a bit, figure out the relationship, then try using it). It also gies them a practical "why are we doing this" reason to make it relevant in the real world, outside of the classroom (which is one thing most homeschoolers excel at!).

I hope that gives you a few ideas, feel free to message me anytime.

-Francis

updated ENE 24, 2011
posted by Francis
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My library in St. Louis features a free database that is better than Rosetta Stone. You can customize your own objectives. Check with your librarian. Our database is called Tell Me More.
www.library.auralog.com
See what you can find out.
Kristie

updated ENE 23, 2011
posted by Kristie
broken link. - Snowleopard, ENE 23, 2011
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I have used Chicos Chicas which is an imersion course for high school and really liked that. I taught it once per week and used levels 1 and 2. I have also used Spanish Three Years for the third year of Spanish and HIGHLY recommend this book! It is an awesome review of all of the verb tenses as well other grammar. One of my students took her placement test for college and tested into second semester second year for Spanish which is exactly where she would have after three years in conventional school! Feel free to email me at dtann@fuse.net if you would like further information. It is difficult as a home educating parent to find good stuff!!!!

By the way, another library resource that I just love and have used in my classes is the PBS series called DESTINOS. It helps with auditory skills.

Sincerely,
CST

updated AGO 20, 2008
posted by Cynthia-Tann
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Hi! I am not exactly a home-schooling parent, since our only child is just 5 1/2 months old! However, I was home-schooled for several years as a child. My father had the advantage of speaking passable Spanish. The MOST IMPORTANT advice I could pass on is this: learn by LISTENING first. Otherwise, you will always be mis-pronouncing words and it will be very difficult to really "get into" the language. For example, if your children are trying to learn a list of vocabulary words, make sure they can hear and say the word well, before they try to write / read it.

Find a Spanish curriculum which comes with cassette tapes or CD's listen and practice. (I think my parents used Lighthouse Publications series and then switched to Audio-Forum, but I have no idea if they are still out there.) Or the more recently available computer courses might be an alternative -- but make sure they use native speakers for LOTS of practice repeating after them.

Another thing my parents did was see that we had some Spanish-speaking friends. In fact they took us to a Spanish-speaking church in the area a few times. (It happened to be a church with a lot of Cubans attending and that was an experience in and of itself, because the Cuban accent is very . . . different!)

updated MAY 19, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Roseta Stone!!!!

updated MAY 19, 2008
posted by george3
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hi dawn. my kids are grown but they were un-schoolers and i love the subject of learning at home, and in community. i think the key is to follow through on any and all interests your kids display... do they want to learn spanish? if so i don't see how you could stop them! books and videos of course are fine resources. can you find any videos in spanish with english subtitles? it's really good to hear the language spoken... the library of course is great. a good spanish english dictionary is worth having in the house. do you yourself speak spanish and/or do you know any other spanish speakers? a language really comes to life when one turns off the tv, puts the books down and begins to engage in real conversations. a thought just off the top of my head is how about a spanish scavenger hunt... a list of items to retrieve all in spanish- they can refer to the dictionary if the words are unfamiliar. how old is/ are your child/ren? they might enjoy looking up and then taping the spanish words for everything all over the house. how much access do you have to any latino neighborhoods? if your kids play in a playground full of other children speaking spanish, they may develop friendships there and learn the language by osmosis... latino music with spanish lyrics are also a wonderful thing to introduce the language and culture

updated FEB 8, 2008
posted by rachel3
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Look at the Beginner's Group page. I have posted bookmarks to information and features of the forum to help you get things started. There are also links for 2 beginners online video programs in the lessons.

updated FEB 7, 2008
posted by Cherry
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