tough verbs

1
vote

How do you say the following:

I should've

I could've

I would've
?

Also, if someone could help me with the verb haber, show me some examples and some examples of how to use the word hubiera, I would appreciate it!

6101 views
updated FEB 19, 2010
posted by Lolita

7 Answers

1
vote

I should've
debiera/debiese

I could've
pudiera/pudiese

I would've
hubiera/hubiese

Si tuviese mas tiempo, te hubiese haber dado una mejor explicación de como se usa haber. Pero no hubo suficiente tiempo.

updated JUN 14, 2011
posted by Christopher
0
votes

Thanks for the reply, Ricardo. However, when you say "you should have used avisar which is forewarn," I must disagree somewhat. Although I agree that using avisar is a good option, I have heard native speakers use decir in this context (that is, not doing something because nobody provided information) many times, and I feel certain that it is correct.

updated MAY 23, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

I think the problem here is trying to translate a phrase not a full sentence in context.
Additionally you have people's different use of the language.

I could have come if someone had told me.
Yo podría haber venido si alguien me hubiese dicho.
Hubiera venido si alguien me bubiera avisado.

Of the two translations above I personally prefer the second one. But they both sound ok on the podria/hubiera side. Strictly speaking Yo podria... is a better equivalent to I could have come. Hubiera venido... is more akin to I would have come.... but to me in Spanish 'podria haber venido' is a mouthful which I would have been unlikely to use.

But you also translate 'told me' as 'decir'. This is a correct transaltion for tell but not in the sense of forewarned, which is the sense here. Now forewarned is not used often in English, but decir does not mean forewarn, it only means tell as in say. So you should have used avisar which is forewarn.

I'm sorry if I sound confusing.
Cheers

updated MAY 22, 2008
posted by RicardoN
0
votes

I wrote:
I could've gone to the movies.
Podría ir al cine.

Since I couldn't edit my post, I'll add a correction.

I could have can be:

Yo habría podido ir si...
I would have been able to go if...

Yo pude haber ido si...
I could have gone if...

I could have come if someone had told me.
Yo podría haber venido si alguien me hubiese dicho.

updated MAY 22, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

I realize that this is an ancient thread that JD resurrected for some reason, but I think the above isn't quite right, or at least complete.

I could've is normally podría, and I would've is habría.

I could've gone to the movies.
Podría ir al cine.

I would've gone to the movies if I had had enough money.
Habría ido al cine si hubiera tendio suficiente dinero.

Native English speakers often make mistakes with this construction. They often say "if I would have had enough money," but that is incorrect in English grammar. On the other hand, if the "could have" comes in the second part of the above construction, it is pudiera.

I would've gone to the movies if I could have borrowed some money.
Habría ido al cine si pudiera pedir prestado el dinero.

updated MAY 22, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Hi
http://users.ipfw.edu/JEHLE/VERBLIST.HTM maybe useful for you?
JD

updated MAY 22, 2008
posted by James-Denny
0
votes

I should have translates as 'deberia' o 'deberia haberlo hecho' (shoudl've is often a short for for i should've done it.)
I could have translates as 'hubiera podido' o 'hubbiera posiso hacerlo" (I could have done it)
I would have translates as 'hubiera hecho' as in 'I would have done it' is 'lo hubiera hecho'
I would've is not used on its own in Spanish.

Haber is an auxiliary verb in Spanish. This means it is used to make verb tenses in the same way that have is an auxiliary verb.. So could is 'poder' and could've is 'hubiera podido'.

Haber also means is as in there is and there are, indicating existence.
For example there were 2 birds. is Habian dos pajaros.

updated DIC 20, 2007
posted by RicardoN