HomeQ&AChicken fingers''?

Chicken fingers''?

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I own a deli and I need the translation for chicken fingers please. Can someone help'

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updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by megan3

13 Answers

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In Spain some people call it "fingers de pollo". But I think is better to ask some spanish speakers of your region. I visited the web site of McDonalds and Burger King in Mexico (and also in Spain and Argentina) but they use a name in english to call the chicken fingers as for example "chicken tenders". I think spanish speakers, for example in Greenbow, Ala-BAMA!, don't mind to know this product only in english and popularly they know it as "chicken fingers". Natasha said "tiras de pollo crujientes", I love how it sounds, it sounds... so tasty, if I visited a place where they have "tiras de pollo crujientes" I would ask for some.(and sorry for the Forrest Gump bad joke, I love that movie).

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by Barrilito
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Literally "strips of crunchy chicken". Makes sense. smile

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by Valerie
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I used to live in Sedalia, MO [USA], where Tyson Chicken has a major packing plant and employs many Spanish-speaking immigrants. So, of course, I had to look at their website. For "Crispy Chicken Strips", they translate "Tiras de Pollo Crujientes". If you are interested, you can look at their website and see how they have translated their various products. There's a handy button to toggle between English and Spanish.

<http://www.tyson.com/Recipes/Product/ViewProduct.aspx'id=85>

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by Natasha
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I think I've heard pollo empanizado for breaded fried boneless chicken breasts.

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by Valerie
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What about pollo emanizado'

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by megan3
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I've heard Yucatecans say "dedos de pollo"... but they think it's hilarious.

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by Valerie
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I don't think the name comes from how the food is eaten. After all, we eat fried chicken (with the bones in place) with our fingers, but that would never be called chicken fingers. The name, as Natasha says, comes from the shape, which is slender like a finger. They are more commonly (where I live) called chicken strips.

Food names are notoriously difficult to translate, and any translation is going to sound stilted. I would just leave it in English and add a description in parentheses or a footnote. I mean, we don't translate taco, paella, tapas, margarita, or the many other foods that are well known in English by their Spanish names.

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Here in Costa Rica, we speak spanish but the fast food restaurants just call them "chicken fingers", everybody knows what they are.

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by WilIbanez
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Hi Nati, I saw the pictures...this is not sold here as far as I can say.

pollo frito...you think of fried chicken , no bread involved.

we would have to say empanado

pollo empanado frito

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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I'd go with "pedacitos (o trozos) de pollo frito."

The point of chicken fingers is that you eat them with your fingers, so they're small pieces of chicken. "Dedos de pollo" sounds like the fingers of the chicken... which is a little weird.

Is there a word for breaded chicken? "Pollo frito" makes me think of the non-breaded kind, but maybe I'm thinking of "pollo a las brasas."

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by Criss
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Heidita, in case you don't know, chicken fingers are small pieces of chicken (strips shaped like a finger, basically) that are usually seasoned and deep-fat-fried. Would "pollo frito" or "pedazitos de pollo frito" work'

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by Natasha
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También: Deditos de pollo

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Yo he encontrado esto, pero no me suena nada:

Norteamericana: Dedos de pollo con mostaza de miel (Chicken Fingers with Honey Mustard)

hmmmm

updated JUL 31, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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