What do the first two "que" mean in the sentence?

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Asi que no teman, que para Dios ustedes valen mas que muchos parajillos. (Mateo 11, Bible)
Any answer would be appreciated.

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updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by Luis-Lu

16 Answers

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Luke 12:6-7 Are not five sparrows sold for two cents? And yet not one of them is forgotten before God. Indeed, the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Do not fear; you are of more value than many sparrows.
Therefore, do not fear, because to God you (plural) are of more value than many sparrows. In spanish, sparrow is Gorrion (accent over the o.)

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by Millie
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throw you for a loop.
wackily: nice word, nice reply.

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by 0074b507
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"Usted" and "ustedes" are second person (formal you, sing & plural, respectively), but they conjugate the same way third person does.

In Latin America, we do not use "vosotros" (second person plural, "temed"), so the only option to tell y'all (you plural) not to fear is "no teman" (the "ustedes" form).

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by Criss
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Thanks. I'd forgotten about -illo endings. Pajarito is in WR dic. but pajarillos no, but when I googled it there were quite a few examples. I'm looking at an article about it on about.com.

and -ico, in some countries, if I remember correctly -apparently this is very popular in Costa Rica.

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by tad
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Luis, I think it's simple: "asi que" is a phrase that means "thus" or "therefore" and introduces the subjunctive / imperative "do not fear"; the second "que" means "that" but is better translated "since". So it begins to sound like what we know as, "Therefore do not fear, for to God you are worth more than the sparrows."

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by Tony-Fanning
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Luis, we are using the imperative form , plural here (polite form for "usted")

look ate complete conjugation here:

http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/temer

And: Hi, discovered the "double click" function yet? Just click on the word you are looking for and it will lead you directly to the dictionary and the different "discussions" with the word involved.

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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The imperative forms of temer are: The second person(single): teme; the third person(single): tema; the first person (plural): temamos; the second person (plural): temed; the third person (plural): teman. If no teman means don't fear, why do we day no teman(the third person)'Why don't we say no teme or no temed? Could you please help me'

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by Luis-Lu
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Here he is speaking to Ustedes.
(Also it is a negative imperative) eg 'teme' but 'no temas'
These imperatives are a pain wink

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by tad
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The imperative forms of temer are: The second person(single): teme; the third person(single): tema; the first person (plural): temamos; the second person (plural): temed; the third person (plural): teman. If no teman means don't fear, why do we day no teman(the third person)'Why don't we say no teme or no temed? Could you please help me'

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by Luis-Lu
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Pájaro = bird

-ito, -illo (and -ico, in some countries, if I remember correctly) are suffixes that make the noun "smaller." Therefore, "pajarillos" (or "pajaritos") would be "little birds."

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by Criss
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Knowing the regular verb ending will help you figure out what the infinitive is (you can tell if it's an AR verb, or an ER/IR verb). Irregular verbs will be harder to "guess," but the ones that are wackily irregular are commonly used verbs so you should get to know those quickly and relatively easily; many irregular verbs are also irregular in a pattern, so finding those out should not be as hard.

Part of the problem in this case is that "teman" is a command (you're telling them "Do not fear/Do not be afraid") which gives "temer" the "opposite" ending (-an instead of -en), which can through you for a loop.

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by Criss
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Yes, that would make it:
So don't fear, since god values you more than many pajarillos.
Entonces, ¿Que son pajarillos'

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by tad
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Mr Tad, thank you. It's pajarillo, no parajillo. Gracias.

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by Luis-Lu
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Thank you, Mr Lazarus, for answering my questions. I have another question to ask you. Sometimes it's very difficult for me to decide the infinitive, for example, teman comes from temer. Are there any dictionaries to look up'

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by Luis-Lu
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Así que... = so...
(ya) que... = since

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by lazarus1907