CADA VEZ

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In certain contexts can this mean More and more'''

3114 views
updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by ken-wong

8 Answers

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In this case, "más gente" would make it mean "more and more." The sentence says, "Each time [every day] more people speak a second language," so the "cada vez [each time]" + "más [more]" implies "more and more people."

updated JUL 14, 2010
posted by Criss
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jaja Lol, I didn't deliberately segue into that but I've always wanted to know. Thx.

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by ken-wong
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Cada vez que la veo, la quiero más y más.

Sounds like you've got it bad, Ken.

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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How would you say, "Each time I see her, I love her more and more"'

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by ken-wong
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As Criss says, "cada vez más" is a set phrase that means more and more, but cada vez by itself just means each time.

"Cada vez más gente habla una segunda lengua."

People are increasingly speaking (learning to speak) a second language.

Other translations are possible, though, and depending on the context, I might say "More and more people are speaking (learning to speak) a second language."

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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hI Ken, please post context next time!

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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What about in this context?

"Cada vez más gente habla una segunda lengua."

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by ken-wong
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"Cada vez" means "each time" (sometimes "every time"). What context(s) are you thinking of? If you say there was "more each time," the overall meaning of the sentence would be "more and more" (but by itself, I don't think it can have that meaning/connotation).

smile Criss.

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by Criss