HomeQ&Ayou took my breath away...

you took my breath away...

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Hi
Can anyone help me translate this into spanish....
'you took my breath away at the airport'

THANK YOU!!!!!
Jess. x

6780 views
updated AGO 15, 2008
posted by jess3

13 Answers

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jess said:

Me quitó sin aliento en el aeropuerto

The last one should be "dejó sin aliento", not "quitó".

updated AGO 15, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Thank you so much for your help on this...
I am a woman who met a man at the airport, I want to write to him and tell him that I thought he was beautiful and his personality was beautiful too....

I am learning spanish and my spanish friend told me to say....
Me quitaste la respiracion en el aeropurto....
is this o.k or which of these are best...
Me quitó el aliento en el aeropurto
Me quitó sin aliento en el aeropurto

Thank you!!!!

updated AGO 15, 2008
posted by jess3
0
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Se nota que eres un traductor profesional,

Sí, pero no de español (ni lo podría).

y que dominas varios idiomas.

Lo que domino es solo el japonés (a veces sí, y a veces no, parece, jeje).

Agradezco mucho tus comentarios, aun cuando no estás de acuerdo conmigo. Digamos que en este caso los dos podemos estar correcto. (¡Qué diplomático soy!, ¿eh')

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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James said:

Pues, me parece perfecto, sin duda. Pero lo traduciría así. The first time he saw her, on the first visit he made to Körner, for the purpose of showing them some plans and an estimate for a chemical plant, which was a major project for Germany; the first time he saw her, he was stunned, frozen in place, with a tingling feeling in his throat and a rush of youth that he had not had, strictly speaking, in his entire life. That was exactly the kind of woman he had always dreamed of!

I guess my point is not that "quedarse con la boca abierta" can't be used as a translation of "take my breath away," but that the English really does focus on the physiological aspect of breath, and since there are ways to express that nuance in Spanish, it seems to me that such expressions would better reflect the English.

Se nota que eres un traductor profesional, y que dominas varios idiomas. Me has convencido.... de momento.

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Figuras literarias son ciertas formas de utilizar las palabras en el sentido de que aunque son empleadas con sus acepciones habituales, son acompañadas de algunas particularidades, que las alejan de un uso normal de las mismas, por lo que terminan por resultar especialmente expresivas. Debido a esto, su uso es característico y en cierta forma exclusivo, de las obras literarias.

De forma coloquial, reciben también el nombre de recursos literarios, recursos estilísticos, recursos retóricos, figuras retóricas, etc.

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by Vernic
0
votes

Pues, me parece perfecto, sin duda. Pero lo traduciría así.

The first time he saw her, on the first visit he made to Körner, for the purpose of showing them some plans and an estimate for a chemical plant, which was a major project for Germany; the first time he saw her, he was stunned, frozen in place, with a tingling feeling in his throat and a rush of youth that he had not had, strictly speaking, in his entire life. That was exactly the kind of woman he had always dreamed of!

I guess my point is not that "quedarse con la boca abierta" can't be used as a translation of "take my breath away," but that the English really does focus on the physiological aspect of breath, and since there are ways to express that nuance in Spanish, it seems to me that such expressions would better reflect the English.

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

I agrre with Lazarus in the use of the prhase con la boca abierta, which is very common also in this context.
notwithstanding I understand the James's position about that it doesn't have the emotive nuance.
I think could be fit well the phrase "Me dejaste prendado"
"En el aeropuerto quedé prendado por tu belleza/ imagen/ porte/ presencia/ elegancia...

quedar prendado, -a de -> to be captivated by.

prendar > to fall in love...

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by Vernic
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¿Qué piensas de esta frase en estos extractos?

La primera vez que la vio, en la primera visita que hizo a Körner, con motivo de enseñarle éste ciertos planos y un presupuesto de una fábrica de productos químicos, gran proyecto del alemán; la primera vez que la vio, se quedó con la boca abierta, pasmado, sintiendo en la garganta hormigueos, y en todo su cuerpo una súbita juventud que no había tenido, propiamente hablando, en toda su vida. ¡Aquellas eran las carnes que él había soñado!

Leopoldo Alas y Ureña ('Clarín')

Fue mi primer sentir: qué gracia la de esta mujer. El brillo de ese pelo, tan largo, tan crespo, tan negro, me dejó con la boca abierta.

Marcela Serrano (escritora chilena)

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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deslumbrado: Impresionado por alguien o algo, particularmente por su aspecto.

If someone said to me that he saw a girl, and then "me dejó con la boca abierta", I could easily imagine him with stunned and paralyzed by her beauty. But maybe others see it differently, or it is not as close as it should be to the original one.

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

You're wrong this time: it doesn't mean "speechless". According to the dictionary María Moliner: Con la boca abierta. Boquiabierto: admirado, asombrado, deslumbrado, pasmado o sorprendido: 'El niño se quedó con la boca abierta al ver los fuegos artificiales'.

But admirado, asombrado, and sorprendido are not what "took my breath away" really means. Pasmado could work, and deslumbrado is certainly a possibility. But I still say that "Me dejaste con la boca abierta" doesn't capture the nuance very well. You would certainly know better than I how it is used, but I have always heard it used in the basic meaning of surprised, and surprise has nothing to do with this English phrase (in this context), which usually means that a person is so overwhelmed with emotion that his lungs stop working momentarily (at least figuratively). In addition to the usual context of romance, it is also used when we hear about something horrible (such as a mass murder or a disaster). In those contexts, this Spanish phrase might be more appropriate.

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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James said:

I'm pretty sure that the first one does not equate with the English, and instead means something like "You left me speechless at the airport." To take someone's breath away usually (but not always) means that the person is stunned by your looks, etc. Therefore, Jess wants to say that he saw a woman (or man) who was extremely beautiful. I think we can also express this as follows.

Maybe. According to the dictionary María Moliner:

Con la boca abierta. Boquiabierto: admirado, asombrado, deslumbrado, pasmado o sorprendido: 'El niño se quedó con la boca abierta al ver los fuegos artificiales'.

My Collins translates "Take someone's breath away" as "dejar pasmado".

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

Me dejaste con la boca abierta en el aeropuerto. Me dejaste pasmado en el aeropuerto. Me dejaste sin aliento en el aeropuerto.

I'm pretty sure that the first one does not equate with the English, and instead means something like "You left me speechless at the airport." To take someone's breath away usually (but not always) means that the person is stunned by your looks, etc. Therefore, Jess wants to say that he saw a woman (or man) who was extremely beautiful. I think we can also express this as follows.

(Tú) me quitaste el aliento.
(Tu belleza) me quitó el aliento.

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Me dejaste con la boca abierta en el aeropuerto.
Me dejaste pasmado en el aeropuerto.
Me dejaste sin aliento en el aeropuerto.

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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