preterito anterior

1
vote

I have been told that the "preterito anterior" is now not much used (eg hube ...; hubiste ...; hubo ...)
Is this right? Should I take a wide berth on trying to learn this part of the indicative verb tense?

Annie.

10825 views
updated MAY 14, 2010
posted by nonombre
Iam in awe of you Annie , I am still struggling with the three times table, good on ya mate.

10 Answers

1
vote

Hi Eddy,

It is the name I have seen most often in English grammars, including the famous A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish, and even in Wikipedia.

The tense (using the Spanish terminology) in indicative is formed using the imperfect indicative of "haber" plus the past participle:

había visto
habías visto
....

In subjunctive is formed using the imperfect subjunctive of "haber" plus the past participle:

hubiera visto
hubieras visto
...

I have checked -just in case- the super thick Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language, and they use this term as well, but they prefer instead "past perfective", and it does not match the Spanish counterpart in many examples, so we have to be very careful about how to use these words: "pluperfect" is a convenient word to translate "pluscuamperfecto".

updated ABR 7, 2015
posted by lazarus1907
1
vote

If u want to practice very elementary spanish, yes, u do not need to learn the complete conjugation of the verbs. On the long run the more u learn the better. Depends how much use of the language u want to do.

updated MAY 14, 2010
posted by Silvia
"In the long run" Hi Silvia sorry if I am intruding I assume you are happy for help, if not please say so . Be well and happy . Ray.
1
vote

Some of you at the beginning seem not to understand what the "pretérito anterior" is. It is not simply the preterit. The preterit anterior is formed with the preterit of "haber" (the forms cited in the original post) PLUS a past participle. Check out this Wikipedia section: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_verbs#Contrasting_the_preterite_and_the_past_anterior

You're right that this tense is almost never used, and basically never, ever used in speech. It should not be difficult to learn, though, because you ought to know the preterit forms of "haber" anyway, and the meaning is pretty self-explanatory if you come across it in literature.

updated MAY 14, 2010
posted by Brad-Gibbons
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

In spoken Spanish this "pretérito" is rarely used, and it is systematically replaced by the pluperfect. You'll find it occasionally in written Spanish, but it is not an essential tense.


So the next time I go to a bullfight I should expect to hear people saying "Maldita la madre que te habia parido! (sorry about the unbalanced/orphaned exclamation point) ''

updated AGO 19, 2008
posted by samdie
0
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Gracias. wink

updated JUL 26, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
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Lazarus
Cannot find the pluperfect tense, Is it called another name ie past subjunctive or something else'

updated JUL 26, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
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Yes...that's in line with what I was told - grasias!

updated JUL 26, 2008
posted by nonombre
0
votes

In spoken Spanish this "pretérito" is rarely used, and it is systematically replaced by the pluperfect. You'll find it occasionally in written Spanish, but it is not an essential tense.

updated JUL 26, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Of the preterite tense, hubo is still used quite a bit.

Hubo un accidente grande en la carretera.

I assume you are only talking about this one verb. The preterite in general is still widely used and very necessary.

updated JUL 25, 2008
posted by Mark-W
0
votes

This is true for the verb haber- have but we do use it with all the other verbs, so my advice is... learn it

updated JUL 25, 2008
posted by Raquel