Sacate ? or a word with a similar sound.

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I would like to know the meaning of "sacate" or similar. It has been used in the context of weed removal as in sacate espinudos for a problem thistle weed. I always thought that it was a form of sacar, as in a familar command, but today I really thought it was being used as a noun. As a background, I'm a vineyard manager talking to my vineyard foreman.

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updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by Molly

5 Answers

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SACATE IS SPELLED CORRECTLY "ZACATE". IT MEANS GRASS LIKE THE ONE THAT GROWS IN THE FRONT LAWN.

updated SEP 17, 2008
posted by LUIS-HERNANDEZ
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Thanks for your help!

updated JUL 28, 2008
posted by Molly
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I think any adjective can be used in nominal form by implying a noun. So "sácate espinudos" would just be "take out thorny ones" or something similar. Your foreman might just be using espinudos as a generic word for thorny weeds.

I am not aware of any noun spelled sacate, and at any rate, if it were a noun, it would have to agree in number with the adjective, and would therefore have to be sacates.

updated JUL 28, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I could be wrong. I thought "espinudos" was being used as an adjective for sacate as in "sacate espinudos", but maybe espinudos can be a noun for the weed thistle as well as an adjective? Would that explain it'

updated JUL 28, 2008
posted by Molly
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Sácate is just colloquial speech for "take out," as you mention, but we would need the original context to be sure. For example, I could also imagine a typo for sacaste.

What makes you think it is a noun? That is, how was it used in the whole sentence'

updated JUL 28, 2008
posted by 00bacfba