HomeQ&Acompadre

compadre

0
votes

como es que este sitio dice que compadre es godfather, si godfather es padrino, no'

9508 views
updated AGO 19, 2008
posted by Ricardo

22 Answers

0
votes

Ricardo said:

I guess I'm placing too much emphasis on the spiritual significance of my bond with my godson; that being godfather with my friend, his father, somehow dilutes being a godparent. pues bien , asi es


Bear in mind that etymologically "compadre" is "con"+"padre" so the sense is that you are "joint parents". The notion of a shared parental responsibility is very much in keeping with the explicitly religious "godparent".

updated AGO 19, 2008
posted by samdie
0
votes

Morning, and Thanks Moving forwrd, I will be comfotable saying: Let me introduce you to my godson Miguel, and his father Mattl or, This is my friend Matt, the father of my godson Miguel. Saluda al joven Miguel.

Be blessed all y Gracias

Ricardo

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by Ricardo
0
votes

i admire the way these discussions are going, they are really healthy ... i also admire the number of languages some of you have mastered! guys, respect!

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by Rina
0
votes

In Spanish, the one word applies to both cases.

Yes it does. this is drifting away from the original post but ...

He tenido un aboroto.

Can mean either.

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

NO, un mal parto es que el parto ha sido malo, doloroso o con dificultad.
Misacarriage: aborto, el bebé ha muerto

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Natasha, I think you have hit the nail on the head. The godfather thing is a Catholic tradition, so it is a bigger part of Spanish-speaking cultures than English-speaking ones (which, though Christian, are not generally as Catholic), which is why English doesn't have the words to address it.

Ricardo, you're putting way too much emphasis on what a dictionary in another language says. How does the lack of another word in English affect the relationship you have with your godson?

Few Americans know what it is to be a godfather to a child (either they are not Catholic to begin with, or if they are, it's a different kind of Catholic than in Latin America). To most Americans, "godfather" implies you can make offers people can't refuse. The meaning of the word in English in no way changes or affects the relationship you have with your godson.

I doubt anyone knows the word can also be used - in English - to refer to the relationship between the child's father and godfather, so no one uses "godfather" in the sense of "compadre" anyway. They barely use the word "godfather" in the sense of "padrino."

I have rarely heard people use the word "godfather" in English unless it is on the day of the baptism; after that people forget that relationship here in the US (I know which of my aunts is my madrina because she's on the Chilean side of the family and she always made a point to do special little things for me, but I always get confused as to which of my American uncles is my godfather because he's never done anything to play that role. I think between the uncles, even they get confused as to which one of us kids each of them was assigned at baptism, even though my mom picked her brothers in age order as we were born).

The lack of a godfather/godson relationship in most Catholic families in the US does not affect the relationship between you and your godson. It's just one more cultural difference you need to accept.

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by Criss
0
votes

But we have the word "miscarriage" in English (what insurance companies do on their forms is a different story, another rant) to differentiate between "spontaneous" and "planned". In Spanish, the one word applies to both cases.

updated JUL 30, 2008
posted by Criss
0
votes

According to Oxford
compadre

(padrino) godfather of one's child or father of one's godchild

(amigo) buddy, mate

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by motley
0
votes

Actually, in English the word abortion refers to both spontaneous abortions (miscarriages) and planned abortions. That's why on a medical history form, for example, it doesn't just say "abortion".

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

pues no, quien soy yo, para decir eso, es mas, en Mexico e dice que un "Miscarriage" es un mal parto, que no'

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by Ricardo
0
votes

I would think the very fact that two words exist in the Spanish language reflects the historical religious significance of godparents in much of the Spanish-speaking world. In other words, the word compadre exists precisely because of the importance of the godfather / godchild relationship.

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

I guess I'm placing too much emphasis on the spiritual significance of my bond with my godson; that being godfather with my friend, his father, somehow dilutes being a godparent. pues bien , asi es

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by Ricardo
0
votes

the correct definiton is this:
compadre.

  1. m. Padrino de bautizo de una criatura, respecto del padre o la madre o la madrina de esta.
  2. m. Padre de una criatura, respecto del padrino o madrina de esta.
  3. m. Con respecto a los padres del confirmado, el padrino en la confirmación.
updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

No entiendo qué es lo que no entiendes, Ricardo. En inglés, sólo hay una palabra para decir dos cosas. En castellano, tenemos una palabra para cada una de esas cosas. El inglés no cambia el significado de las palabras en castellano.

En castellano se usa la palabra "aborto" para un "abortion" y para un "miscarriage." ¿Vas a tratar de decirme que esos dos eventos son la misma cosa?

Yes, there should be a separate word in English for "compadre." But there isn't. Sometimes, that's just the way it is.

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by Criss
0
votes

si Lynelle, son comadres. Pero el que tu entiendas, no me ayuda en este momento. Que dificl es aceptar lo que hacen los franceses, pero bueno, que mas da? Buen dia a todos

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by Ricardo
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.