HomeQ&Arange (in math)

range (in math)

0
votes

I teach math.
there are two meanings for "range":
1. the range (output) of a function
2. the range of a set of data (largest subtract smallest)

Are both words el rango'

9056 views
updated AGO 13, 2008
posted by holly3

12 Answers

1
vote

Yes, both are called "rango".

updated DIC 23, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
0
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If you're using Windows Vista: Start...All Programs...Accessories...Character set...find U+03F5 or Greek Lunate Epsilon symbol. ''''? That looks like it to me.

updated AGO 13, 2008
posted by 0074b507
0
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Heidita said:

Oh, I am on a mistaken page...Thought this was a Spanish-English...how has it become Chinese'jejej

LOL=Laugh Out Loud

You're funny, Heidita!!

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
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Oh, I am on a mistaken page...Thought this was a Spanish-English...how has it become Chinese?
jejej

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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¡Of course! I don't have the symbol, but I mean "containing or equal to".

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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lazarus1907 said:

So "rango" here is basically the superset containing the image, right? I have to admit I don't remember this much about the usage of this word. I need to get a hold of one of the Maths textbooks in Spanish I studied long time ago to check whether this usage also apply. "Dominio" and "imagen" are the terms I remeber most clearly.

Yes, exactly!! --as long as "superset" implies that the two sets could be identical.

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

So "rango" here is basically the superset containing the image, right? I have to admit I don't remember this much about the usage of this word. I need to get a hold of one of the Maths textbooks in Spanish I studied long time ago to check whether this usage also apply. "Dominio" and "imagen" are the terms I remeber most clearly.

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

Natasha said:

lazarus1907 said:

1) Rango o imagen2) Rango

Not to get too technical, but . . . when we are speaking of mathematical functions, range has two possible interpretations (in English) and is sometimes used differently in different textbooks. The range may refer to all possible outcomes being considered and in that sense is part of the definition of the function. (You must specifiy domain and range to completely define a function, although they are often assumed.)When range is used in that sense, "image" refers to the actual output when a particular set of data is input into the function.Does the distinction hold in Spanish?

You're too used to students, Natasha. I am more used to precise Mathematical jargon than to that kind of explanations, and I am not sure I understand you.I personally learnt the terms dominio and imagen like this (I'll use the euro sign for "pertenece a"):Sea f: A ? B una función.Dominio de una función (dom f) is the set of values for which the function is defined.Imagen de una función: {y ? a B : existe a ? A tal que y = f(a)} = {f(a) : a ? dom f}Imagen:But I know some people say "rango" instead of "imagen".Does this answer your question?

I think so. In other words, it appears quite likely that in terms of mathematics, "rango" in Spanish is an exact correspondent to "range" in English. Likewise, "imagen" in Spanish appears to be correspondent to "image" in English. However, image/imagen and range/rango do not necessarily mean the same thing.

From an old textbook of mine, "Bridge to Abstract Mathematics: Mathematical Proof and Structures", comes the following definition for a function:

A function is a relation R having the property that if (x,y) ? R and (x,z) ? R, then y = z.

A relation, in this sense, is a relation between two sets A and B; A is the domain and B is the range, to revert to function terminology. The image of the function is only those values in B to which the function actually maps.

For example, I could define f:R->R (f a function from domain all reals to range all reals) by the following rule:

f(x)=1

Then the range would still be R (all reals), but the image would just be {1}.

It matters to mathematicians . . . really . . . although I fear we're far afield from the original question.

I am trusting that your excellent English will enable you to understand my reply. I will not attempt to say any of this in Spanish.

(P.S. No, my text does not use the European "element of" symbol, but I don't know how to type the American one. I just copied yours.)

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Natasha said:

lazarus1907 said:

1) Rango o imagen2) Rango

Not to get too technical, but . . . when we are speaking of mathematical functions, range has two possible interpretations (in English) and is sometimes used differently in different textbooks. The range may refer to all possible outcomes being considered and in that sense is part of the definition of the function. (You must specifiy domain and range to completely define a function, although they are often assumed.)

When range is used in that sense, "image" refers to the actual output when a particular set of data is input into the function.

Does the distinction hold in Spanish?

You're too used to students, Natasha. I am more used to precise Mathematical jargon than to that kind of explanations, and I am not sure I understand you.

I personally learnt the terms dominio and imagen like this (I'll use the euro sign for "pertenece a"):

Sea f: A ? B una función.
Dominio de una función (dom f) is the set of values for which the function is defined.
Imagen de una función: {y ? a B : existe a ? A tal que y = f(a)} = {f(a) : a ? dom f}
Imagen:

But I know some people say "rango" instead of "imagen".

Does this answer your question'

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

1) Rango o imagen2) Rango

Not to get too technical, but . . . when we are speaking of mathematical functions, range has two possible interpretations (in English) and is sometimes used differently in different textbooks. The range may refer to all possible outcomes being considered and in that sense is part of the definition of the function. (You must specifiy domain and range to completely define a function, although they are often assumed.)

When range is used in that sense, "image" refers to the actual output when a particular set of data is input into the function.

Does the distinction hold in Spanish'

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
votes

Thank you!

Guillermo said:

Yes, both are called "rango".

>

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by holly3
0
votes

1) Rango o imagen
2) Rango

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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