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1
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What are all the grammatical possibilities of having these two pronouns together.

2692 views
updated SEP 19, 2016
posted by tad

15 Answers

1
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The sentence "se le puede matar el novio" might have sense in a context where "matar" is used with the meaning of "morir". I've seen this use of the verb "matar". Not entirely sure this is right though

updated DIC 19, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
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Tendremos que esperar hasta que salga el tomo de Lazarus...

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Well I did what James said and googled 'se le' and this was one of the entries -it turns out it was an WR enquiry about what we are talking about! -so I'm going to read it (when I have a mo) it's this one

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by tad
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Si te refieres a mi comentario, no hay nada de malo. Son dos significados distintos. Por otra parte si lees bien, lo que yo dije es "se le puede morir el novio".
Todavía sigues buscando pelea? El tema del "enfardo" sigue pendiente.

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by 00e657d4
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Se le pude morir al novio?
Eso sí sería raro.

¿Qué hay de malo con se le puede matar al novio'

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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The "le" does seem to imply that someone is killing the boyfriend for her, since you have a direct and indirect object. Where did the sentence come from? Do you have any context? Could the "al" have been mistyped as "el"'

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by Criss
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Muy bien James.

¿cómo se le puede matar el novio...
understood the personal A

But what is 'le' doing here then, If matarse is "to be killed" (I seem to remember as a result of an accident) what is 'le' doing here then, I mean, wouldn't
'¿cómo se puede matar el novio' ....work'

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by tad
0
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Se le fue el novio
Her boyfriend walked out on her

Great.

Se Le Apago La Luz
The light went out on him

The "on him" is usually just implied in English, but yes.

Al Que Fuma La Vida Se Le Hace Humo Cartel

The cartel here doesn't make sense, but if you remove that, the phrase means, roughly, "He who smokes will see his life go up in smoke." I think.

Y se le quema la casa
and the house burned down on him (not literally)

It should be in present tense, but otherwise OK.

¿cómo se le puede matar el novio...
How one can kill the boyfriend -ah, wait a minute, this is impersonal then...

No, that's not the meaning. Matarse means "to be killed" in addition to "to kill oneself." If it were your meaning, it would have to be "al novio" (that's exactly why the personal A is so important in Spanish). I think this one means "How can the boyfriend get killed'"

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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These are my guesses for the first few

Se le fue el novio
Her boyfriend walked out on her

Se Le Apago La Luz
The light went out on him

Al Que Fuma La Vida Se Le Hace Humo Cartel
I don't know

Y se le quema la casa
and the house burned down on him (not literally)

¿cómo se le puede matar el novio...
How one can kill the boyfriend -ah, wait a minute, this is impersonal then...

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by tad
0
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That's a big question, Tad.
I'm not so sure....
*
' le(s) lo/la - se lo/la (typical transformation from indirect object to SE)
' SE = makes the verb intransitive, makes the sentence passive or impersonal, ...*

I'm not counting the first of these - I'm not including lo/la where 'se lo' replaces 'le lo' ONLY se le (where obviously se is not replacing le and le is an indirect pronoun).

I get very confused distinguishing passive from impersonal -that is I am unclear as to their definitions -but I'm thinking with an impersonal statement le cannot be involved anyway (')
which would leave
' SE = makes the verb intransitive, makes the sentence passive.

With Silvia's example above:
A Maria al pasar se le cayeron las llaves.

that 'se le cayeron' (intimating the keys fell from her rather than she dropped them)
is that a passive statement?

Just wait until I finish my book

I am waiting until you finish your book.

If you google the two words in quotes, you can read lots of examples of how they are used.
I'm going to try that now.

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by tad
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Just wait until I finish my book

Ah, but then we would all learn your name. The true identity of the masked crusader, revealed at last. Unless you plan on publishing under a nom de plume, that is.

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Grammatically, not as many as you think, but in practice a lot:

' le(s) lo/la - se lo/la (typical transformation from indirect object to SE)
' SE = makes the verb intransitive, makes the sentence passive or impersonal, ...

The "lo" pronoun is a direct one in almost every case, anyway.

Just wait until I finish my book... if you can take some grammar.

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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A Maria al pasar se le cayeron las llaves.

a is mandatory here.

We must wait for lazarus.

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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That's a big question, Tad.

If you google the two words in quotes, you can read lots of examples of how they are used. Then, if you encounter something that you don't understand, you can ask about that specifically here.

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
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bueno(all) son bastantes. Pero aqui va un ejemplo: Maria al pasar se le cayeron las llaves.

updated JUL 29, 2008
posted by Silvia
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