mijo

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wat does mijo mean'

17524 views
updated MAR 21, 2011
posted by savannah-nicole-sixta
my friend who is Spanish calls her husband by that name. thanks for your help!

22 Answers

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Eddy said:

I suppose it appealed to my sarcastic sense of humour. As you say, we obviously have different senses of humour. Señor 2) obviously knew what señor 1) was saying and I thought his (sarcastic) answer was funny.

I agree that it's funny in Spanish. I was asking how you think it is funny in English, in which it makes no sense at all. You said "It is funny, even when translating into English."

  • The rice is soft.
  • And what is it saying?

If you still think the above is funny, then we are from different humor planets.

updated MAR 21, 2011
posted by 00bacfba
many thanks to all for the answer!
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Eddy said:

Hi Tim EivissaYou are almost correct about the four candles sketch. It actually lasts about 6 minutes with various other items. Extremely funny and it did come to be known as the Four Candles sketch. Click below to see exactly what happened.[http://www.youtube.com/watch?

v=qu9MptWyCB8][1]

This is hilarious, the four candles did it! I didn't' understand a single item he was asking ! very funny!

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Hi Tim Eivissa
You are almost correct about the four candles sketch. It actually lasts about 6 minutes with various other items. Extremely funny and it did come to be known as the Four Candles sketch. Click below to see exactly what happened.

<http://www.youtube.com/watch'v=qu9MptWyCB8>

updated AGO 14, 2008
posted by Eddy
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TimEivissa said:

There's a famous comedy duo in England called the 2 Ronnies and one of their best loved sketches is when a man goes into a hardware store(ferreteria) and asks for FORK HANDLES,the shopkeeper gives him a very strange look and tells him that they don't sell them! They then have an argument with the customer saying they must sell them as it's a hardware store and the shop owner insisting they don't.

Eventually the owner asks the customer what he wants them for anyway and he tells him it's because the electricity isn't working.

The shopkeeper realises his mistake and says "Oh,you mean FOUR CANDLES!"

Reminds me of an old Benny Hill gag. I don't recall the specifics, but a customer is ordering breakfast in a German cafe, and he and the waitress say this:

FUNEMNX?
SVFMNX.
OKLFMNX.

Hint: you have to read the letters with a German accent.

Translation:
"Have you any ham and eggs '"
Yes, we have ham and eggs"
O.K. I'll have ham and eggs"

updated AGO 13, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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There's a famous comedy duo in England called the 2 Ronnies and one of their best loved sketches is when a man goes into a hardware store(ferreteria) and asks for FORK HANDLES,the shopkeeper gives him a very strange look and tells him that they don't sell them!
They then have an argument with the customer saying they must sell them as it's a hardware store and the shop owner insisting they don't.
Eventually the owner asks the customer what he wants them for anyway and he tells him it's because the electricity isn't working.
The shopkeeper realises his mistake and says "Oh,you mean FOUR CANDLES!"
It's not the same as the Spanish joke but it's the best I could think of at short notice! grin

updated AGO 13, 2008
posted by TimEivissa
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Eddy said:

James we could keep this up for the rest of the year. If you cannot see the humour in the sarcatic answer then lets just cut this short.

Hi Eddy, I think James was trying to express the reason why the joke is funny in Spanish, but not in English is the pronunciation of two short phrases and misunderstanding of the second person (should say the second person got the wrong meaning of the same pronunciation). People would get confused why it is funny after it's translated to English because there is no same pronunciation for these two short phrases and people wouldn't get wrong idea, unless not speaking English well. smile
Personally I think misspelling makes a lot of confusions and harder to understand, learn and speak Spanish, especially for the people who (are like me) are not native speakers and trying to learn.

Thank you,

Marco

updated AGO 13, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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Thank you Eddy, it is exactly what I was looking for.

updated AGO 13, 2008
posted by Zoltán
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James we could keep this up for the rest of the year. If you cannot see the humour in the sarcatic answer then lets just cut this short.

updated AGO 13, 2008
posted by Eddy
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I suppose it appealed to my sarcastic sense of humour. As you say, we obviously have different senses of humour. Señor 2) obviously knew what señor 1) was saying and I thought his (sarcastic) answer was funny. That's it.

updated AGO 13, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Eddy said:

It is funny, even when translating into English.

Señor 1) says, "El arroz está blando" - The rice is soft

Señor 2) thinks he is saying - The rice is talking and replies really, what is it saying.

Eddy (long time no see!), we may not share the same sense of humor, but how is that even remotely funny in English? The whole point of the joke (misinterpreting the words está blando) is lost. Such jokes can be explained, but they usually cannot be translated without greatly changing the joke.

updated AGO 13, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Zoltán
It is funny, even when translating into English.
Señor 1) says, "El arroz está blando" - The rice is soft
Señor 2) thinks he is saying - The rice is talking and replies really, what is it saying.

updated AGO 13, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Well, English not being my first language is showing, sorry about that. As for translators, I meant Babel Fish, Google, etc. not the human contributers on this forum. All of you are great educators.

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by Zoltán
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lazarus1907 said:

Zoltán said:

What you have clarified is the only thing I understood. What I am missing is the complete joke. I know it is a play on words, but I cannot translated to English. (I think it was you who said that translators do not work well, and that I proved to myself over and over.)

You're welcome!

If you understood it, why on Earth do you write what does it mean, instead of "how would you translate it into English? We might not work well, but you don't seem to be able to ask the right questions (...or thank us for trying to answer them).

I'm pretty sure that by "translators" Zoltan meant machine translation, not us human translators.

Zoltan, there is no way to translate the joke into English, because it is a play on Spanish words. We would have to come up with completely different words to convey the same concept in English, which would basically mean coming up with a new joke from scratch.

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Zoltán said:

What you have clarified is the only thing I understood. What I am missing is the complete joke. I know it is a play on words, but I cannot translated to English. (I think it was you who said that translators do not work well, and that I proved to myself over and over.)

You're welcome!
If you understood it, why on Earth do you write what does it mean, instead of "how would you translate it into English? We might not work well, but you don't seem to be able to ask the right questions (...or thank us for trying to answer them).

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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What you have clarified is the only thing I understood. What I am missing is the complete joke. I know it is a play on words, but I cannot translated to English. (I think it was you who said that translators do not work well, and that I proved to myself over and over.)

updated AGO 12, 2008
posted by Zoltán